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Adjacent Words

Shory
Shoshannim
SHOSHANNIM EDUTH
Shoshannim-Eduth
Shoshone
Shoshone Falls
Shoshone River
Shoshonean
Shoshonean language
Shoshones
Shoshoni
Shoshonian
Shoshonian language
Shostakovich
Shot belt
Shot cartridge
shot clock
Shot garland
Shot gauge
shot glass
shot hole
shot in the arm
shot in the dark
Shot locker
shot metal
Shot of a cable
Shot prop
shot put
shot putter

Shot definitions

Webster's 1828 Dictionary

SHOT, pret. and pp. of shoot.
SHOT, n.
1. The act of shooting; discharge of a missile weapon.
He caused twenty shot of his greatest cannon to be made at the king's army.
Clarendon.
[Note. The plural shots, may be used, but shot is generally used in both numbers.]
2. A missile weapon, particularly a ball or bullet. Shot is properly what is discharged from fire-arms or cannons by the force of gunpowder. Shot used in war is of various kinds; as, roundshot or balls; those for cannon make of iron, those for muskets and pistols, of lead. Secondly, double headed shot or bar shot, consisting of a bar with a round head at each end. Thirdly, chain-shot, consisting of to balls chained together. Fourthly, grape-shot, consisting of a number of balls bound together with a cord in canvas on an iron bottom. Fifthly, case shot or canister shot, consisting of a great number of small bullets in a cylindrical tin box. Sixthly, langrel or langrage, which consists of pieces of iron of any kind or shape. Small shot, denotes musket balls.
3. Small globular masses of lead, used for killing fowls and other small animals. These are not called balls or bullets.
4. The flight of a missile weapon, or the distance which it passes from the engine; as a cannon shot; a musket shot; a pistol shot; a bow shot.
5. A reckoning; charge or proportional share of expense. [See Scot.]
Shot of a cable, in seaman's language, the splicing of two cables together; or the whole length of two cables thus united. A ship will ride easier with one shot of cable thus lengthened, than with three short cables.

WordNet (r) 3.0 (2005)

adj
1: varying in color when seen in different lights or from different angles; "changeable taffeta"; "chatoyant (or shot) silk"; "a dragonfly hovered, vibrating and iridescent" [syn: changeable, chatoyant, iridescent, shot] n
1: the act of firing a projectile; "his shooting was slow but accurate" [syn: shooting, shot]
2: a solid missile discharged from a firearm; "the shot buzzed past his ear" [syn: shot, pellet]
3: (sports) the act of swinging or striking at a ball with a club or racket or bat or cue or hand; "it took two strokes to get out of the bunker"; "a good shot requires good balance and tempo"; "he left me an almost impossible shot" [syn: stroke, shot]
4: a chance to do something; "he wanted a shot at the champion" [syn: shot, crack]
5: a person who shoots (usually with respect to their ability to shoot); "he is a crack shot"; "a poor shooter" [syn: shot, shooter]
6: a consecutive series of pictures that constitutes a unit of action in a film [syn: scene, shot]
7: the act of putting a liquid into the body by means of a syringe; "the nurse gave him a flu shot" [syn: injection, shot]
8: a small drink of liquor; "he poured a shot of whiskey" [syn: nip, shot]
9: an aggressive remark directed at a person like a missile and intended to have a telling effect; "his parting shot was `drop dead'"; "she threw shafts of sarcasm"; "she takes a dig at me every chance she gets" [syn: shot, shaft, slam, dig, barb, jibe, gibe]
10: an estimate based on little or no information [syn: guess, guesswork, guessing, shot, dead reckoning]
11: an informal photograph; usually made with a small hand-held camera; "my snapshots haven't been developed yet"; "he tried to get unposed shots of his friends" [syn: snapshot, snap, shot]
12: sports equipment consisting of a heavy metal ball used in the shot put; "he trained at putting the shot"
13: an explosive charge used in blasting
14: a blow hard enough to cause injury; "he is still recovering from a shot to his leg"; "I caught him with a solid shot to the chin"
15: an attempt to score in a game
16: informal words for any attempt or effort; "he gave it his best shot"; "he took a stab at forecasting" [syn: shot, stab]
17: the launching of a missile or spacecraft to a specified destination [syn: blastoff, shot]

Merriam Webster's

I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English sceot, scot; akin to Old High German scuz, Old Norse skot shot, Old English sc?otan to shoot more at shoot Date: before 12th century 1. a. an action of shooting b. a directed propelling of a missile; specifically a directed discharge of a firearm c. (1) a stroke or throw in an attempt to score points in a game (as tennis, pool, or basketball); also home run (2) ability to shoot <has the best shot on the team> d. blast 5a e. a medical or narcotics injection 2. a. plural shot something propelled by shooting; especially small lead or steel pellets especially forming a charge for a shotgun b. a metal sphere of iron or brass that is heaved in the shot put 3. a. the distance that a missile is or can be thrown b. range, reach 4. a charge to be paid ; scot 5. one that shoots; especially marksman 6. a. attempt, try <give it a shot> b. guess, conjecture c. chance 4a <a shot at winning the prize> d. a single appearance as an entertainer <did a guest shot for the program> 7. an effective remark; especially swipe 2 <a parting shot> 8. a. a single photographic exposure; especially snapshot b. a single sequence of a motion picture or a television program shot by one camera without interruption 9. a charge of explosives 10. a. a small measure or serving (as one ounce) of undiluted liquor or other beverage <vodka shots> <a shot of espresso> b. a small amount applied at one time ; dose <a shot of fertilizer> <a shot of humor> 11. shot plural sprinkles, jimmies II. past and past participle of shoot III. adjective Date: 1763 1. a. of a fabric having contrasting and changeable color effects ; iridescent b. suffused or streaked with a color <hair shot with gray> c. infused or permeated with a quality or element <shot through with wit> 2. having the form of pellets resembling shot 3. reduced to a ruined or useless state <his nerves are shot>

Oxford Reference Dictionary

1. n. 1 the act or an instance of firing a gun, cannon, etc. (several shots were heard). 2 an attempt to hit by shooting or throwing etc. (took a shot at him). 3 a a single non-explosive missile for a cannon, gun, etc. b (pl. same or shots) a small lead pellet used in quantity in a single charge or cartridge in a shotgun. c (as pl.) these collectively. 4 a a photograph. b a film sequence photographed continuously by one camera. 5 a a stroke or a kick in a ball game. b colloq. an attempt to guess or do something (let him have a shot at it). 6 colloq. a person having a specified skill with a gun etc. (is not a good shot). 7 a heavy ball thrown by a shot-putter. 8 the launch of a space rocket (a moonshot). 9 the range, reach, or distance to or at which a thing will carry or act (out of earshot). 10 a remark aimed at a person. 11 colloq. a a drink of esp. spirits. b an injection of a drug, vaccine, etc. (has had his shots). Phrases and idioms: like a shot colloq. without hesitation; willingly. make a bad shot guess wrong. not a shot in one's (or the) locker 1 no money left. 2 not a chance left. shot-blasting the cleaning of metal etc. by the impact of a stream of shot. shot-firer a person who fires a blasting-charge in a mine etc. shot in the arm colloq. 1 stimulus or encouragement. 2 an alcoholic drink. shot in the dark a mere guess. shot-put an athletic contest in which a shot is thrown a great distance. shot-putter an athlete who puts the shot. shot-tower hist. a tower in which shot was made from molten lead poured through sieves at the top and falling into water at the bottom. Derivatives: shotproof adj. Etymology: OE sc(e)ot, gesc(e)ot f. Gmc: cf. SHOOT 2. past and past part. of SHOOT. --adj. 1 (of coloured material) woven so as to show different colours at different angles. 2 colloq. a exhausted; finished. b drunk. 3 (of a board-edge) accurately planed. Phrases and idioms: be (or get) shot of sl. be (or get) rid of. shot through permeated or suffused. Etymology: past part. of SHOOT 3. n. colloq. a reckoning, a bill, esp. at an inn etc. (paid his shot). Etymology: ME, = SHOT(1): cf. OE sceotan shoot, pay, contribute, and SCOT

Webster's 1913 Dictionary

Shoot Shoot, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Shot; p. pr. & vb. n. Shooting. The old participle Shotten is obsolete. See Shotten.] [OE. shotien, schotien, AS. scotian, v. i., sce['o]tan; akin to D. schieten, G. schie?en, OHG. sciozan, Icel. skj?ta, Sw. skjuta, Dan. skyde; cf. Skr. skund to jump. [root]159. Cf. Scot a contribution, Scout to reject, Scud, Scuttle, v. i., Shot, Sheet, Shut, Shuttle, Skittish, Skittles.] 1. To let fly, or cause to be driven, with force, as an arrow or a bullet; -- followed by a word denoting the missile, as an object. If you please To shoot an arrow that self way. --Shak. 2. To discharge, causing a missile to be driven forth; -- followed by a word denoting the weapon or instrument, as an object; -- often with off; as, to shoot a gun. The two ends od a bow, shot off, fly from one another. --Boyle. 3. To strike with anything shot; to hit with a missile; often, to kill or wound with a firearm; -- followed by a word denoting the person or thing hit, as an object. When Roger shot the hawk hovering over his master's dove house. --A. Tucker. 4. To send out or forth, especially with a rapid or sudden motion; to cast with the hand; to hurl; to discharge; to emit. An honest weaver as ever shot shuttle. --Beau. & Fl. A pit into which the dead carts had nightly shot corpses by scores. --Macaulay. 5. To push or thrust forward; to project; to protrude; -- often with out; as, a plant shoots out a bud. They shoot out the lip, they shake the head. --Ps. xxii. 7. Beware the secret snake that shoots a sting. --Dryden. 6. (Carp.) To plane straight; to fit by planing. Two pieces of wood that are shot, that is, planed or else pared with a paring chisel. --Moxon. 7. To pass rapidly through, over, or under; as, to shoot a rapid or a bridge; to shoot a sand bar. She . . . shoots the Stygian sound. --Dryden. 8. To variegate as if by sprinkling or intermingling; to color in spots or patches. The tangled water courses slept, Shot over with purple, and green, and yellow. --Tennyson. To be shot of, to be discharged, cleared, or rid of. [Colloq.] ``Are you not glad to be shot of him?'' --Sir W. Scott.

Webster's 1913 Dictionary

Shot Shot, imp. & p. p. of Shoot.

Webster's 1913 Dictionary

Shot Shot, a. Woven in such a way as to produce an effect of variegation, of changeable tints, or of being figured; as, shot silks. See Shoot, v. t., 8.

Webster's 1913 Dictionary

Shot Shot, n. [AS. scot, sceot, fr. sce['o]tan to shoot; akin to D. sschot, Icel. skot. [root]159. See Scot a share, Shoot, v. t., and cf. Shot a shooting.] A share or proportion; a reckoning; a scot. Here no shots are where all shares be. --Chapman. A man is never . . . welcome to a place till some certain shot be paid and the hostess say ``Welcome.'' --Shak.

Webster's 1913 Dictionary

Shot Shot, n.; pl. Shotor Shots. [OE. shot, schot, AS. gesceot a missile; akin to D. schot a shot, shoot, G. schuss, geschoss a missile, Icel. skot a throwing, a javelin, and E. shoot, v.t. [root]159. See Shoot, and cf. Shot a share.] 1. The act of shooting; discharge of a firearm or other weapon which throws a missile. He caused twenty shot of his greatest cannon to be made at the king's army. --Clarendon. 2. A missile weapon, particularly a ball or bullet; specifically, whatever is discharged as a projectile from firearms or cannon by the force of an explosive. Note: Shot used in war is of various kinds, classified according to the material of which it is composed, into lead, wrought-iron, and cast-iron; according to form, into spherical and oblong; according to structure and modes of operation, into solid, hollow, and case. See Bar shot, Chain shot, etc., under Bar, Chain, etc. 3. Small globular masses of lead, of various sizes, -- used chiefly for killing game; as, bird shot; buckshot. 4. The flight of a missile, or the distance which it is, or can be, thrown; as, the vessel was distant more than a cannon shot. 5. A marksman; one who practices shooting; as, an exellent shot. Shot belt, a belt having a pouch or compartment for carrying shot. Shot cartridge, a cartridge containing powder and small shot, forming a charge for a shotgun. Shot garland (Naut.), a wooden frame to contain shot, secured to the coamings and ledges round the hatchways of a ship. Shot gauge, an instrument for measuring the diameter of round shot. --Totten. shot hole, a hole made by a shot or bullet discharged. Shot locker (Naut.), a strongly framed compartment in the hold of a vessel, for containing shot. Shot of a cable (Naut.), the splicing of two or more cables together, or the whole length of the cables thus united. Shot prop (Naut.), a wooden prop covered with tarred hemp, to stop a hole made by the shot of an enemy in a ship's side. Shot tower, a lofty tower for making shot, by dropping from its summit melted lead in slender streams. The lead forms spherical drops which cool in the descent, and are received in water or other liquid. Shot window, a window projecting from the wall. Ritson, quoted by Halliwell, explains it as a window that opens and shuts; and Wodrow describes it as a window of shutters made of timber and a few inches of glass above them.

Webster's 1913 Dictionary

Shot Shot, n.; pl. Shotor Shots. [OE. shot, schot, AS. gesceot a missile; akin to D. schot a shot, shoot, G. schuss, geschoss a missile, Icel. skot a throwing, a javelin, and E. shoot, v.t. [root]159. See Shoot, and cf. Shot a share.] 1. The act of shooting; discharge of a firearm or other weapon which throws a missile. He caused twenty shot of his greatest cannon to be made at the king's army. --Clarendon. 2. A missile weapon, particularly a ball or bullet; specifically, whatever is discharged as a projectile from firearms or cannon by the force of an explosive. Note: Shot used in war is of various kinds, classified according to the material of which it is composed, into lead, wrought-iron, and cast-iron; according to form, into spherical and oblong; according to structure and modes of operation, into solid, hollow, and case. See Bar shot, Chain shot, etc., under Bar, Chain, etc. 3. Small globular masses of lead, of various sizes, -- used chiefly for killing game; as, bird shot; buckshot. 4. The flight of a missile, or the distance which it is, or can be, thrown; as, the vessel was distant more than a cannon shot. 5. A marksman; one who practices shooting; as, an exellent shot. Shot belt, a belt having a pouch or compartment for carrying shot. Shot cartridge, a cartridge containing powder and small shot, forming a charge for a shotgun. Shot garland (Naut.), a wooden frame to contain shot, secured to the coamings and ledges round the hatchways of a ship. Shot gauge, an instrument for measuring the diameter of round shot. --Totten. shot hole, a hole made by a shot or bullet discharged. Shot locker (Naut.), a strongly framed compartment in the hold of a vessel, for containing shot. Shot of a cable (Naut.), the splicing of two or more cables together, or the whole length of the cables thus united. Shot prop (Naut.), a wooden prop covered with tarred hemp, to stop a hole made by the shot of an enemy in a ship's side. Shot tower, a lofty tower for making shot, by dropping from its summit melted lead in slender streams. The lead forms spherical drops which cool in the descent, and are received in water or other liquid. Shot window, a window projecting from the wall. Ritson, quoted by Halliwell, explains it as a window that opens and shuts; and Wodrow describes it as a window of shutters made of timber and a few inches of glass above them.

Webster's 1913 Dictionary

Shot Shot, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Shotted; p. pr. & vb. n. Shotting.] To load with shot, as a gun. --Totten.

Webster's 1913 Dictionary

Shot Shot, n. 1. (Fisheries) (a) A cast of a net. (b) The entire throw of nets at one time. (c) A place or spot for setting nets. (d) A single draft or catch of fish made. 2. (Athletics) A spherical weight, to be put, or thrown, in competition for distance. 3. A stroke or propulsive action in certain games, as in billiards, hockey, curling, etc.; also, a move, as in chess. 4. A guess; conjecture; also, an attempt. [Colloq.]

Collin's Cobuild Dictionary

(shots) Frequency: The word is one of the 1500 most common words in English. 1. Shot is the past tense and past participle of shoot. 2. A shot is an act of firing a gun. He had murdered Perceval at point blank range with a single shot... A man fired a volley of shots at them. N-COUNT 3. Someone who is a good shot can shoot well. Someone who is a bad shot cannot shoot well. He was not a particularly good shot because of his eyesight. N-COUNT: adj N 4. In sports such as football, golf, or tennis, a shot is an act of kicking, hitting, or throwing the ball, especially in an attempt to score a point. He had only one shot at goal. N-COUNT 5. A shot is a photograph or a particular sequence of pictures in a film. ...a shot of a fox peering from the bushes... N-COUNT 6. If you have a shot at something, you attempt to do it. (INFORMAL) The heavyweight champion will be given a shot at Holyfield's world title. N-COUNT: usu sing, usu N at n 7. A shot of a drug is an injection of it. He administered a shot of Nembutal. N-COUNT: usu N of n 8. A shot of a strong alcoholic drink is a small glass of it. (AM) ...a shot of vodka. N-COUNT 9. If you give something your best shot, you do it as well as you possibly can. (INFORMAL) I don't expect to win. But I am going to give it my best shot. PHRASE: V inflects 10. The person who calls the shots is in a position to tell others what to do. The directors call the shots and nothing happens without their say-so. PHRASE: V inflects 11. If you do something like a shot, you do it without any delay or hesitation. (INFORMAL) I heard the key turn in the front door and I was out of bed like a shot... PHRASE: PHR after v 12. If you describe something as a long shot, you mean that it is unlikely to succeed, but is worth trying. The deal was a long shot, but Bagley had little to lose... PHRASE: v-link PHR 13. People sometimes use the expression by a long shot to emphasize the opinion they are giving. The missile-reduction treaty makes sweeping cuts, but the arms race isn't over by a long shot. PHRASE [emphasis] 14. If something is shot through with an element or feature, it contains a lot of that element or feature. This is an argument shot through with inconsistency. PHRASE: V inflects, PHR n 15. a shot in the dark: see dark

Soule's Dictionary of English Synonyms

I. n. 1. Discharge. 2. Ball, bullet, missile, projectile. 3. Marksman, shooter. 4. Range, reach. 5. Young hog. See shote. II. a. 1. Chatoyant, iridescent, irisated. 2. Interwoven, interspersed, intermingled.

1811 Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue

To pay one's shot; to pay one's share of a reckoning. Shot betwixt wind and water; poxed or clapped.

Moby Thesaurus

Nimrod, SOL, Telephoto, Wirephoto, admission, admission fee, aerial photograph, all bets off, all off, all over, all up, altitude peak, anchorage, ante, antelope, antitoxin, approach, archer, arrow, artilleryman, assay, at an end, at once, attempt, automatic control, bag, ball, balled up, bang, bar shot, bark, bet, bicolor, bicolored, bid, bird shot, black-and-white photograph, blast, blast-off, blind guess, blue darter, blue streak, bold conjecture, bollixed up, book, boom shot, boost, booster, booster dose, booster shot, boozy, bowman, bowshot, break, brokerage, buckshot, buggered, buggered up, bullet, burn, burnout, burst, by no means, call the shots, canceled, candid photograph, canned, cannon, cannon shot, cannonball, cannoneer, carabineer, carfare, case shot, cast, ceiling, cellarage, chance, charge, charges, cheesecake, chronophotograph, chunk, close-up, color photograph, color print, colorful, colory, complete, concluded, conjecture, cooked, courser, cover charge, crack, crack shot, crap, craps, crazy, crossbar shot, crushed, daedal, dart, dashed, dead, dead shot, deadeye, decided, deck, defunct, deleted, demand, demoralized, descent, detonation, deuce shot, diapositive, dichromatic, discharge, disguised, divers-colored, dockage, done, done for, done with, dose, draft, dram, drench, drink, drop, dropping, drug packet, drunk, duck shot, dues, dumdum bullet, eagle, effort, ejection, electricity, encouragement, end of burning, endeavor, ended, entrance fee, essay, exaction, exactment, expanding bullet, experiment, explosion, express train, expunged, extinct, fare, fee, finger, fini, finished, fix, flash, flight, fling, follow-focus shot, fouled up, full shot, fulmination, fusillade, gambit, gargle, gazelle, go, good shot, grape, grapeshot, greased lightning, greyhound, group shot, guess, gummed up, gun, gunfire, gunman, gunner, gunshot, guzzle, handbook, hare, harlequin, hashed up, hastily, hazard, heliochrome, heliograph, hire, hit, hunch, hunter, hurriedly, hypodermic, hypodermic injection, ignition, immediately, impact, incentive, inducement, inebriated, injection, inoculation, instantaneously, instantly, jet injection, jet plane, jigger, jolt, kaleidoscopic, kaput, kinescope, langrel shot, launch, libation, license fee, lick, lift-off, light, lightning, like a flash, like a shot, like greased lightning, long shot, look-in, loused up, mainlining, manstopping bullet, many-colored, marksman, markswoman, matte shot, medium shot, medley, mercury, messed up, missile, montage, motion picture, motivation, motley, move, mucked up, muddled, mug, mug shot, multicolor, multicolored, multicolorous, musketeer, narcotic injection, narcotic shot, natural, neurasthenic, never, nick, nip, no way, occasion, offer, on no account, opening, opportunity, over, overdose, pan shot, panoramic shot, parlay, parti-color, parti-colored, peg, pellet, perfected, perhaps, photo, photobiography, photochronograph, photograph, photomap, photomicrograph, photomontage, photomural, picture, pilotage, pinup, pixilated, plastered, play, polychromatic, polychrome, polychromic, pop, popping, portage, portion, portrait, potation, potion, potshot, prismal, process shot, projectile, prostrate, prostrated, provocation, pull, queered, quickly, quicksilver, rap shot, rapidly, reduced to jelly, retake, rifle ball, rifleman, rocket, rocket launching, roll, rough guess, round, round of drinks, round shot, rule the roost, salvage, salvo, scared rabbit, scot, scot and lot, screwed up, set at rest, settled, shaken, sharpshooter, shell, shoot, shooter, shooting, shooting up, shot through, shot to pieces, show, shrapnel, sip, skin-popping, slap, slide, slug, snafued, snap, snapshot, snarled up, snifter, sniper, snort, spectral, speculation, speedily, split shot, spot, spray, squeak, stab, stagger, stake, step, still, still photograph, stimulus, stoneshot, storage, streak, streak of lightning, stricken, striped snake, stroke, strong bid, suck, sunk, sup, surmise, swallow, swiftly, swig, swill, take, targetshooter, tattoo, telephotograph, tentative, terminated, thought, through, through with, throw, thunder and lightning, thunderbolt, time, toll, torrent, tot, towage, toxophilite, trajectory, transparency, trapshooter, travel shot, trial, trial and error, trichromatic, trichromic, tricolor, tricolored, trucking shot, try, two-tone, under no circumstances, undertaking, undone, unglued, unmanned, unnerved, unstrung, unverified supposition, upset, vaccination, vaccine, varicolored, variegated, velocity peak, versicolor, versicolored, volley, wager, washed up, wet, whack, wharfage, whirl, wild guess, wind, wiped out, wound up, zapped, zoom shot




 


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