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prodder
prodding
Prodigal
prodigal son
Prodigality
Prodigalize
Prodigally
Prodigate
Prodigence
Prodigies
Prodigious
Prodigiously
Prodigiousness
Prodition
Proditor
Proditorious
Proditory
prodn
prodroma
prodromal
Prodrome
prodromic
Prodromous
Prodromus
Produce

Prodigy definitions

Webster's 1828 Dictionary

PROD'IGY, n. [L. prodigium, from prodigo, to shoot out, drive out, properly to spread to a great extent.
1. Any thing out of the ordinary process of nature, as so extraordinary as to excite wonder or astonishment; as a prodigy of learning.
2. Something extraordinary from which omens are drawn; portent. Thus eclipses and meteors were anciently deemed prodigies.
3. A monster; an animal or other production out of the ordinary course of nature.

WordNet (r) 3.0 (2005)

n
1: an unusually gifted or intelligent (young) person; someone whose talents excite wonder and admiration; "she is a chess prodigy"
2: a sign of something about to happen; "he looked for an omen before going into battle" [syn: omen, portent, presage, prognostic, prognostication, prodigy]
3: an impressive or wonderful example of a particular quality; "the Marines are expected to perform prodigies of valor"

Merriam Webster's

noun (plural -gies) Etymology: Middle English, from Latin prodigium omen, monster, from pro-, prod- + -igium (akin to aio I say) more at adage Date: 15th century 1. a. a portentous event ; omen b. something extraordinary or inexplicable 2. a. an extraordinary, marvelous, or unusual accomplishment, deed, or event b. a highly talented child or youth

Oxford Reference Dictionary

n. (pl. -ies) 1 a person endowed with exceptional qualities or abilities, esp. a precocious child. 2 a marvellous thing, esp. one out of the ordinary course of nature. 3 (foll. by of) a wonderful example (of a quality). Etymology: L prodigium portent

Webster's 1913 Dictionary

Prodigy Prod"i*gy, n.; pl. Prodigies. [ L. prodigium; pro before + (perh.) a word appearing in adagium adage: cf. F. prodige. Cf. Adage. ] 1. Something extraordinary, or out of the usual course of nature, from which omens are drawn; a portent; as, eclipses and meteors were anciently deemed prodigies. So many terrors, voices, prodigies, May warn thee, as a sure foregoing sign. --Milton. 2. Anything so extraordinary as to excite wonder or astonishment; a marvel; as, a prodigy of learning. 3. A production out of ordinary course of nature; an abnormal development; a monster. --B. Jonson. Syn: Wonder; miracle; portent; marvel; monster.

Collin's Cobuild Dictionary

(prodigies) A prodigy is someone young who has a great natural ability for something such as music, mathematics, or sport. ...a Russian tennis prodigy. N-COUNT: usu supp N

Soule's Dictionary of English Synonyms

n. 1. Marvel, portent, wonder, miracle. 2. Monster, monstrosity, unnatural product.

Moby Thesaurus

A per se, abnormality, ace, amazement, anomaly, astonishing thing, astonishment, boss, brain, champion, chief, child prodigy, commander, conversation piece, crackerjack, curio, curiosity, dean, enchantment, exception, fantasy, ferlie, first-rater, fugleman, gazingstock, genius, gifted child, gifted person, good hand, great, head, higher-up, improbability, intellect, intellectual genius, intellectual prodigy, laureate, leader, leading light, luminary, magician, mahatma, man of genius, man of parts, marvel, marvelment, master, master hand, mastermind, mental genius, mental giant, miracle, museum piece, natural, nonesuch, nonpareil, oddity, paragon, past master, phenomenon, practiced hand, principal, prodigiosity, quite a thing, rarity, ruler, sage, senior, sensation, sight, sign, skilled hand, something else, spectacle, star, strange thing, stunner, superior, superman, superstar, talent, the greatest, the most, top dog, topnotcher, virtuoso, whiz, wizard, wonder, wonderful thing, wonderment, wonderwork




 


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