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Adjacent Words

Porcula papuensis
Porcupine
Porcupine ant-eater
porcupine ball
Porcupine crab
Porcupine disease
porcupine fish
porcupine fishes
Porcupine grass
porcupine provision
Porcupine wood
Porcupine-fish
porcupinefish
porcupines
pore fungus
pore mushroom
pore over
Pore-blind
Poreblind
pored
Porer
porgee
porgie
Porgies
Porgy
Pori

Pore definitions

Webster's 1828 Dictionary

PORE, n. [Gr. to go, to pass.; Eng. to fare. See Fare.]
1. In anatomy, a minute interstice in the skin of an animal, through which the perspirable matter passes to the surface or is excreted.
2. A small spiracle, opening or passage in other substances; as the pores of plants or of stones.
PORE, v.i. [Gr. to inspect.] To look with steady continued attention or application. To pore on, is to read or examine with steady perseverance, to dwell on; and the word seems to be limited in its application to the slow patient reading or examination of books, or something written or engraved.
Painfully to pore upon a book.
With sharpened sight pale antiquaries pore.

WordNet (r) 3.0 (2005)

n
1: any tiny hole admitting passage of a liquid (fluid or gas)
2: any small opening in the skin or outer surface of an animal
3: a minute epidermal pore in a leaf or stem through which gases and water vapor can pass [syn: stoma, stomate, pore] v
1: direct one's attention on something; "Please focus on your studies and not on your hobbies" [syn: concentrate, focus, center, centre, pore, rivet]

Merriam Webster's

I. intransitive verb (pored; poring) Etymology: Middle English pouren Date: 13th century 1. to gaze intently 2. to read or study attentively usually used with over 3. to reflect or meditate steadily II. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French, from Latin porus, from Greek poros passage, pore more at fare Date: 14th century 1. a minute opening especially in an animal or plant; especially one by which matter passes through a membrane 2. a small interstice (as in soil) admitting absorption or passage of liquid pored adjective

Oxford Reference Dictionary

1. n. esp. Biol. a minute opening in a surface through which gases, liquids, or fine solids may pass. Etymology: ME f. OF f. L porus f. Gk poros passage, pore 2. v.intr. (foll. by over) 1 be absorbed in studying (a book etc.). 2 meditate on, think intently about (a subject). Etymology: ME pure etc. perh. f. OE purian (unrecorded): cf. PEER(1)

Webster's 1913 Dictionary

Pore Pore, n. [F., fr. L. porus, Gr. ? a passage, a pore. See Fare, v.] 1. One of the minute orifices in an animal or vegetable membrane, for transpiration, absorption, etc. 2. A minute opening or passageway; an interstice between the constituent particles or molecules of a body; as, the pores of stones.

Webster's 1913 Dictionary

Pore Pore, v. i. [imp. & p. p. Pored; p. pr. & vb. n. Poring.] [OE. poren, of uncertain origin; cf. D. porren to poke, thrust, Gael. purr.] To look or gaze steadily in reading or studying; to fix the attention; to be absorbed; -- often with on or upon, and now usually with over.``Painfully to pore upon a book.'' --Shak. The eye grows weary with poring perpetually on the same thing. --Dryden.

Collin's Cobuild Dictionary

(pores, poring, pored) 1. Your pores are the tiny holes in your skin. The size of your pores is determined by the amount of oil they produce. N-COUNT: usu pl 2. The pores of a plant are the tiny holes on its surface. A plant's lungs are the microscopic pores in its leaves. N-COUNT: usu pl 3. If you pore over or through information, you look at it and study it very carefully. We spent hours poring over travel brochures... VERB: V over/through n 4. You can say that someone has a certain quality or emotion coming from every pore to emphasize the strength of that quality or emotion. She oozes sexuality from every pore... PHRASE [emphasis]

Soule's Dictionary of English Synonyms

I. n. Orifice, spiracle, small opening. II. v. n. Brood, dwell, look steadily, fix the attention, give one's mind, read steadily, examine diligently.

Moby Thesaurus

Eustachian tube, Fallopian tube, aperture, avenue, blowhole, broaching, canal, cavity, channel, chasm, check, chute, clearing, cleft, con, crack, debouch, disclosure, door, duct, egress, emunctory, escape, estuary, examine, exhaust, exit, fenestra, fistula, floodgate, flume, fontanel, foramen, gap, gape, gat, go over, gulf, hiatus, hole, hollow, inlet, interval, intestines, lacuna, laying open, leak, loophole, meatus, opening, opening up, orifice, ostium, out, outcome, outfall, outgate, outgo, outlet, oviduct, passageway, perforation, peruse, pore over, port, read, sally port, salpinx, scrutinize, slot, sluice, space, spiracle, split, spout, stoma, study, tap, thoracic duct, throwing open, uncorking, unstopping, ureter, urethra, vagina, vas, vent, ventage, venthole, vessel, vomitory, way out, weir, yawn




 


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