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Weather definitions

Webster's 1828 Dictionary

WEATHER, n. Wether. [G., The primary sense of this word is air, wind or atmosphere; probably the Gr., whence ether.] Properly, the air; hence,
1. The state of the air or atmosphere with respect to heat or cold, wetness or dryness, calm or storm, clearness or cloudiness, and the like; as warm weather; cold weather; wet weather; dry weather; calm weather; tempestuous weather; fair weather; cloudy weather; hazy weather, and the like.
2. Change of the state of the air.
3. Storm; tempest.
[These last significations are not now in use, unless by a poetic license.]
Stress of weather, violent winds; force of tempests.
WEATHER, v.t. wether.
1. To air; to expose to the air. [Rarely used.]
2. In seamens language, to sail to the windward of something else; as, to weather a cape; to weather another ship. As this is often difficult, hence,
3. To pass with difficulty.
To weather a point, to gain or accomplish it against opposition.
To weather out, to endure; to hold out to the end; as, to weather out a storm.
Weather is used with several words, either as an adjective, or as forming part of a compound word.

WordNet (r) 3.0 (2005)

adj
1: towards the side exposed to wind [syn: upwind, weather] n
1: the atmospheric conditions that comprise the state of the atmosphere in terms of temperature and wind and clouds and precipitation; "they were hoping for good weather"; "every day we have weather conditions and yesterday was no exception"; "the conditions were too rainy for playing in the snow" [syn: weather, weather condition, conditions, atmospheric condition] v
1: face and withstand with courage; "She braved the elements" [syn: weather, endure, brave, brave out]
2: cause to slope
3: sail to the windward of
4: change under the action or influence of the weather; "A weathered old hut"

Merriam Webster's

I. noun Etymology: Middle English weder, from Old English; akin to Old High German wetar weather, Old Church Slavic vetr? wind Date: before 12th century 1. the state of the atmosphere with respect to heat or cold, wetness or dryness, calm or storm, clearness or cloudiness 2. state or vicissitude of life or fortune 3. disagreeable atmospheric conditions: as a. rain, storm b. cold air with dampness 4. weathering II. verb (weathered; weathering) Date: 15th century transitive verb 1. to expose to the open air ; subject to the action of the elements 2. to bear up against and come safely through <weather a storm> <weather a crisis> intransitive verb to undergo or endure the action of the elements III. adjective Date: 1582 of or relating to the side facing the wind compare lee

NOAA Weather Glossary

State of the atmosphere with respect to heat or cold, wetness ordryness, calm or storm, clearness or cloudiness. Also, weather is the meteorologicalday-to-day variations of the atmosphere and their effects on life and human activity. Itincludes temperature, pressure, humidity, clouds, wind, precipitation and fog.

Oxford Reference Dictionary

n. & v. --n. 1 the state of the atmosphere at a place and time as regards heat, cloudiness, dryness, sunshine, wind, and rain etc. 2 (attrib.) Naut. windward (on the weather side). --v. 1 tr. expose to or affect by atmospheric changes, esp. deliberately to dry, season, etc. (weathered timber). 2 a tr. (usu. in passive) discolour or partly disintegrate (rock or stones) by exposure to air. b intr. be discoloured or worn in this way. 3 tr. make (boards or tiles) overlap downwards to keep out rain etc. 4 tr. a come safely through (a storm). b survive (a difficult period etc.). 5 tr. (of a ship or its crew) get to the windward of (a cape etc.). Phrases and idioms: keep a (or one's) weather eye open be watchful. make good (or bad) weather of it Naut. (of a ship) behave well (or badly) in a storm. make heavy weather of colloq. exaggerate the difficulty or burden presented by (a problem, course of action, etc.). under the weather colloq. indisposed or out of sorts. weather-beaten affected by exposure to the weather. weather-bound unable to proceed owing to bad weather. weather-chart (or -map) a diagram showing the state of the weather over a large area. weather forecast an analysis of the state of the weather with an assessment of likely developments over a certain time. weather-glass a barometer. weather side the side from which the wind is blowing (opp. lee side). weather station an observation post for recording meteorological data. weather-strip a piece of material used to make a door or window proof against rain or wind. weather-tiles tiles arranged to overlap like weatherboards. weather-vane see VANE. weather-worn damaged by storms etc. Etymology: OE weder f. Gmc

Webster's 1913 Dictionary

Weather Weath"er, n. [OE. weder, AS. weder; akin to OS. wedar, OFries. weder, D. weder, we[^e]r, G. wetter, OHG. wetar, Icel. ve[eth]r, Dan. veir, Sw. v["a]der wind, air, weather, and perhaps to OSlav. vedro fair weather; or perhaps to Lith. vetra storm, Russ. vieter', vietr', wind, and E. wind. Cf. Wither.] 1. The state of the air or atmosphere with respect to heat or cold, wetness or dryness, calm or storm, clearness or cloudiness, or any other meteorological phenomena; meteorological condition of the atmosphere; as, warm weather; cold weather; wet weather; dry weather, etc. Not amiss to cool a man's stomach this hot weather. --Shak. Fair weather cometh out of the north. --Job xxxvii. 22. 2. Vicissitude of season; meteorological change; alternation of the state of the air. --Bacon. 3. Storm; tempest. What gusts of weather from that gathering cloud My thoughts presage! --Dryden. 4. A light rain; a shower. [Obs.] --Wyclif. Stress of weather, violent winds; force of tempests. To make fair weather, to flatter; to give flattering representations. [R.] To make good, or bad, weather (Naut.), to endure a gale well or ill; -- said of a vessel. --Shak. Under the weather, ill; also, financially embarrassed. [Colloq. U. S.] --Bartlett. Weather box. Same as Weather house, below. --Thackeray. Weather breeder, a fine day which is supposed to presage foul weather. Weather bureau, a popular name for the signal service. See Signal service, under Signal, a. [U. S.] Weather cloth (Naut.), a long piece of canvas of tarpaulin used to preserve the hammocks from injury by the weather when stowed in the nettings. Weather door. (Mining) See Trapdoor, 2. Weather gall. Same as Water gall, 2. [Prov. Eng.] --Halliwell. Weather house, a mechanical contrivance in the form of a house, which indicates changes in atmospheric conditions by the appearance or retirement of toy images. Peace to the artist whose ingenious thought Devised the weather house, that useful toy! --Cowper. Weather molding, or Weather moulding (Arch.), a canopy or cornice over a door or a window, to throw off the rain. Weather of a windmill sail, the obliquity of the sail, or the angle which it makes with its plane of revolution. Weather report, a daily report of meteorological observations, and of probable changes in the weather; esp., one published by government authority. Weather spy, a stargazer; one who foretells the weather. [R.] --Donne. Weather strip (Arch.), a strip of wood, rubber, or other material, applied to an outer door or window so as to cover the joint made by it with the sill, casings, or threshold, in order to exclude rain, snow, cold air, etc.

Webster's 1913 Dictionary

Weather Weath"er, n. [OE. weder, AS. weder; akin to OS. wedar, OFries. weder, D. weder, we[^e]r, G. wetter, OHG. wetar, Icel. ve[eth]r, Dan. veir, Sw. v["a]der wind, air, weather, and perhaps to OSlav. vedro fair weather; or perhaps to Lith. vetra storm, Russ. vieter', vietr', wind, and E. wind. Cf. Wither.] 1. The state of the air or atmosphere with respect to heat or cold, wetness or dryness, calm or storm, clearness or cloudiness, or any other meteorological phenomena; meteorological condition of the atmosphere; as, warm weather; cold weather; wet weather; dry weather, etc. Not amiss to cool a man's stomach this hot weather. --Shak. Fair weather cometh out of the north. --Job xxxvii. 22. 2. Vicissitude of season; meteorological change; alternation of the state of the air. --Bacon. 3. Storm; tempest. What gusts of weather from that gathering cloud My thoughts presage! --Dryden. 4. A light rain; a shower. [Obs.] --Wyclif. Stress of weather, violent winds; force of tempests. To make fair weather, to flatter; to give flattering representations. [R.] To make good, or bad, weather (Naut.), to endure a gale well or ill; -- said of a vessel. --Shak. Under the weather, ill; also, financially embarrassed. [Colloq. U. S.] --Bartlett. Weather box. Same as Weather house, below. --Thackeray. Weather breeder, a fine day which is supposed to presage foul weather. Weather bureau, a popular name for the signal service. See Signal service, under Signal, a. [U. S.] Weather cloth (Naut.), a long piece of canvas of tarpaulin used to preserve the hammocks from injury by the weather when stowed in the nettings. Weather door. (Mining) See Trapdoor, 2. Weather gall. Same as Water gall, 2. [Prov. Eng.] --Halliwell. Weather house, a mechanical contrivance in the form of a house, which indicates changes in atmospheric conditions by the appearance or retirement of toy images. Peace to the artist whose ingenious thought Devised the weather house, that useful toy! --Cowper. Weather molding, or Weather moulding (Arch.), a canopy or cornice over a door or a window, to throw off the rain. Weather of a windmill sail, the obliquity of the sail, or the angle which it makes with its plane of revolution. Weather report, a daily report of meteorological observations, and of probable changes in the weather; esp., one published by government authority. Weather spy, a stargazer; one who foretells the weather. [R.] --Donne. Weather strip (Arch.), a strip of wood, rubber, or other material, applied to an outer door or window so as to cover the joint made by it with the sill, casings, or threshold, in order to exclude rain, snow, cold air, etc.

Webster's 1913 Dictionary

Weather Weath"er, v. i. To undergo or endure the action of the atmosphere; to suffer meteorological influences; sometimes, to wear away, or alter, under atmospheric influences; to suffer waste by weather. The organisms . . . seem indestructible, while the hard matrix in which they are imbedded has weathered from around them. --H. Miller.

Webster's 1913 Dictionary

Weather Weath"er, a. (Naut.) Being toward the wind, or windward -- opposed to lee; as, weather bow, weather braces, weather gauge, weather lifts, weather quarter, weather shrouds, etc. Weather gauge. (a) (Naut.) The position of a ship to the windward of another. (b) Fig.: A position of advantage or superiority; advantage in position. To veer, and tack, and steer a cause Against the weather gauge of laws. --Hudibras. Weather helm (Naut.), a tendency on the part of a sailing vessel to come up into the wind, rendering it necessary to put the helm up, that is, toward the weather side. Weather shore (Naut.), the shore to the windward of a ship. --Totten. Weather tide (Naut.), the tide which sets against the lee side of a ship, impelling her to the windward. --Mar. Dict.

Webster's 1913 Dictionary

Weather Weath"er, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Weathered; p. pr. & vb. n. Weathering.] 1. To expose to the air; to air; to season by exposure to air. [An eagle] soaring through his wide empire of the air To weather his broad sails. --Spenser. This gear lacks weathering. --Latimer. 2. Hence, to sustain the trying effect of; to bear up against and overcome; to sustain; to endure; to resist; as, to weather the storm. For I can weather the roughest gale. --Longfellow. You will weather the difficulties yet. --F. W. Robertson. 3. (Naut.) To sail or pass to the windward of; as, to weather a cape; to weather another ship. 4. (Falconry) To place (a hawk) unhooded in the open air. --Encyc. Brit. To weather a point. (a) (Naut.) To pass a point of land, leaving it on the lee side. (b) Hence, to gain or accomplish anything against opposition. To weather out, to encounter successfully, though with difficulty; as, to weather out a storm.

Collin's Cobuild Dictionary

(weathers, weathering, weathered) Frequency: The word is one of the 1500 most common words in English. 1. The weather is the condition of the atmosphere in one area at a particular time, for example if it is raining, hot, or windy. The weather was bad... I like cold weather... Fishing is possible in virtually any weather. ...the weather conditions. 2. If something such as wood or rock weathers or is weathered, it changes colour or shape as a result of the wind, sun, rain, or cold. Unpainted wooden furniture weathers to a grey colour... This rock has been weathered and eroded. VERB: V, be V-ed, also V n weathered The facade of the building was a little weathered... The man had a worn, weathered face. = weather-beaten ADJ 3. If you weather a difficult time or a difficult situation, you survive it and are able to continue normally after it has passed or ended. The government has weathered its worst political crisis. to weather the storm: see storm VERB: V n 4. If you say that someone is making heavy weather of a task, you are critical of them because they are doing it in an inefficient way and are making it seem more difficult than it really is. (BRIT) Some of the riders in this section made heavy weather of the cross-country race. PHRASE: V inflects, PHR n [disapproval] 5. If you say that you are under the weather, you mean that you feel slightly ill. I was still feeling a bit under the weather. = unwell PHRASE: v-link PHR

International Standard Bible Encyclopedia

weth'-er (zahabh (Job 37:22), yom (Pr 25:20), translated "day"; eudia, "clear sky," cheimon, "tempest"): In the East it is not customary to talk of the weather as in the West. There seems to be no word in the Hebrew corresponding to "weather." In Job 37:22 the King James Version translates "Fair weather comes out of the north," but the Revised Version (British and American) translates more literally, "Out of the north cometh golden splendor." "As one that taketh off a garment in cold weather (or literally, "on a cold day"), .... so is he that singeth songs to a heavy heart" (Pr 25:20).

Jesus rebukes the Pharisees for their lack of spiritual foresight when they took such interest in natural foresight. He said, "When it is evening, ye say, It will be fair weather: for the heaven is red. And in the morning, It will be foul weather to-day: for the heaven is red and lowering" (Mt 16:2,3). The general conditions of the weather in the different seasons are less variable in Palestine than in colder countries, but the precise weather for a given day is very hard to predict on account of the proximity of the mountains, the desert and the sea.

Alfred H. Joy

Soule's Dictionary of English Synonyms

v. a. 1. (Naut.) Pass to windward of, pass between the wind and. 2. Endure, sustain, bear, stand, bear up against, get the better of, resist, encounter and sustain.

Moby Thesaurus

ablate, abrade, be safe, be unflappable, beat the game, beat the system, bring to, calm weather, climate, clime, cold weather, come through, come up fighting, come up smiling, erode, fair weather, flanking, forces of nature, fray, frazzle, fret, get home free, glancing, good weather, halcyon days, haul, haul off, haul the wind, haul to, haul up, head to windward, heave to, hold fast, hold out, hold up, hot weather, keep safe, lateral, lee, leeward, live through, macroclimate, make heavy weather, microclimate, next-beside, not budge, outride, persevere, rainy weather, remain firm, ride, ride it out, ride out, rub off, sail to windward, side, sideling, sidelong, sideward, sidewards, sideway, sideways, sidewise, skirting, stand fast, stand firm, stand pat, stay put, stick it out, stormy weather, tatter, the elements, tide over, triumph, uphelm, wear, wear away, wear down, wear off, wear out, wear ragged, weather deck, weather helm, weather out, weather sheet, weather side, weather tack, weather the storm, weather wheel, weatherboard, win out, win through, windiness, windward, windward ebb, windward flood



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