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Vindicate
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Vine apple
Vine beetle
Vine borer
vine cactus
Vine dragon
Vine forester
Vine fretter
Vine grub
Vine hopper
Vine inchworm
Vine louse
vine maple
Vine mildew
Vine of Sodom

Vine definitions

Webster's 1828 Dictionary

VINE, n. [L. vinca. See Wine.]
1. A plant that produces grapes, of the genus Vitis, and of a great number of varieties.
2. The long slender stem of any plant, that trails on the ground, or climbs and supports itself by winding round a fixed object, or by seizing any fixed thing with its tendrils or claspers. Thus we speak of the hop vine, the bean vine, the vines of melons, squashes, pumpkins, and other encurbitaceous plants.

WordNet (r) 3.0 (2005)

n
1: a plant with a weak stem that derives support from climbing, twining, or creeping along a surface

Merriam Webster's

I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French vigne, from Latin vinea vine, vineyard, from feminine of vineus of wine, from vinum wine more at wine Date: 14th century 1. grape 2 2. a. a plant whose stem requires support and which climbs by tendrils or twining or creeps along the ground; also the stem of such a plant b. any of various sprawling herbaceous plants (as a tomato or potato) that lack specialized adaptations for climbing II. intransitive verb (vined; vining) Date: 1796 to form or grow in the manner of a vine

Oxford Reference Dictionary

n. 1 any climbing or trailing woody-stemmed plant, esp. of the genus Vitis, bearing grapes. 2 a slender trailing or climbing stem. Phrases and idioms: vine-dresser a person who prunes, trains, and cultivates vines. Derivatives: viny adj. Etymology: ME f. OF vi(g)ne f. L vinea vineyard f. vinum wine

Webster's 1913 Dictionary

Vine Vine, n. [F. vigne, L. vinea a vineyard, vine from vineus of or belonging to wine, vinum wine, grapes. See Wine, and cf. Vignette.] (Bot.) (a) Any woody climbing plant which bears grapes. (b) Hence, a climbing or trailing plant; the long, slender stem of any plant that trails on the ground, or climbs by winding round a fixed object, or by seizing anything with its tendrils, or claspers; a creeper; as, the hop vine; the bean vine; the vines of melons, squashes, pumpkins, and other cucurbitaceous plants. There shall be no grapes on the vine. --Jer. viii. 13. And one went out into the field to gather herbs, and found a wild vine, and gathered thereof wild gourds. --2 Kings iv. 89. Vine apple (Bot.), a small kind of squash. --Roger Williams. Vine beetle (Zo["o]l.), any one of several species of beetles which are injurious to the leaves or branches of the grapevine. Among the more important species are the grapevine fidia (see Fidia), the spotted Pelidnota (see Rutilian), the vine fleabeetle (Graptodera chalybea), the rose beetle (see under Rose), the vine weevil, and several species of Colaspis and Anomala. Vine borer. (Zo["o]l.) (a) Any one of several species of beetles whose larv[ae] bore in the wood or pith of the grapevine, especially Sinoxylon basilare, a small species the larva of which bores in the stems, and Ampeloglypter sesostris, a small reddish brown weevil (called also vine weevil), which produces knotlike galls on the branches. (b) A clearwing moth ([AE]geria polistiformis), whose larva bores in the roots of the grapevine and is often destructive. Vine dragon, an old and fruitless branch of a vine. [Obs.] --Holland. Vine forester (Zo["o]l.), any one of several species of moths belonging to Alypia and allied genera, whose larv[ae] feed on the leaves of the grapevine. Vine fretter (Zo["o]l.), a plant louse, esp. the phylloxera that injuries the grapevine. Vine grub (Zo["o]l.), any one of numerous species of insect larv[ae] that are injurious to the grapevine. Vine hopper (Zo["o]l.), any one of several species of leaf hoppers which suck the sap of the grapevine, especially Erythroneura vitis. See Illust. of Grape hopper, under Grape. Vine inchworm (Zo["o]l.), the larva of any species of geometrid moths which feed on the leaves of the grapevine, especially Cidaria diversilineata. Vine-leaf rooer (Zo["o]l.), a small moth (Desmia maculalis) whose larva makes a nest by rolling up the leaves of the grapevine. The moth is brownish black, spotted with white. Vine louse (Zo["o]l.), the phylloxera. Vine mildew (Bot.), a fungous growth which forms a white, delicate, cottony layer upon the leaves, young shoots, and fruit of the vine, causing brown spots upon the green parts, and finally a hardening and destruction of the vitality of the surface. The plant has been called Oidium Tuckeri, but is now thought to be the conidia-producing stage of an Erysiphe. Vine of Sodom (Bot.), a plant named in the Bible (--Deut. xxxii. 32), now thought to be identical with the apple of Sodom. See Apple of Sodom, under Apple. Vine sawfly (Zo["o]l.), a small black sawfiy (Selandria vitis) whose larva feeds upon the leaves of the grapevine. The larv[ae] stand side by side in clusters while feeding. Vine slug (Zo["o]l.), the larva of the vine sawfly. Vine sorrel (Bot.), a climbing plant (Cissus acida) related to the grapevine, and having acid leaves. It is found in Florida and the West Indies. Vine sphinx (Zo["o]l.), any one of several species of hawk moths. The larv[ae] feed on grapevine leaves. Vine weevil. (Zo["o]l.) See Vine borer (a) above, and Wound gall, under Wound.

Collin's Cobuild Dictionary

(vines) A vine is a plant that grows up or over things, especially one which produces grapes. = grapevine N-VAR

Easton's Bible Dictionary

one of the most important products of Palestine. The first mention of it is in the history of Noah (Gen. 9:20). It is afterwards frequently noticed both in the Old and New Testaments, and in the ruins of terraced vineyards there are evidences that it was extensively cultivated by the Jews. It was cultivated in Palestine before the Israelites took possession of it. The men sent out by Moses brought with them from the Valley of Eshcol a cluster of grapes so large that "they bare it between two upon a staff" (Num. 13: 23). The vineyards of En-gedi (Cant. 1:14), Heshbon, Sibmah, Jazer, Elealeh (Isa. 16:8-10; Jer. 48:32, 34), and Helbon (Ezek. 27:18), as well as of Eshcol, were celebrated.

The Church is compared to a vine (Ps. 80:8), and Christ says of himself, "I am the vine" (John 15:1). In one of his parables also (Matt. 21:33) our Lord compares his Church to a vineyard which "a certain householder planted, and hedged round about," etc.

Hos. 10:1 is rendered in the Revised Version, "Israel is a luxuriant vine, which putteth forth his fruit," instead of "Israel is an empty vine, he bringeth forth fruit unto himself," of the Authorized Version.

International Standard Bible Encyclopedia

vin:

1. Hebrew Words:

(1) gephen, usually the cultivated grape vine. In Nu 6:4; Jud 13:14 we have gephen ha-yayin, literally, "vine of wine," translated "grape vine" (Numbers) and "vine," margin "grape vine" (Jgs); 2Ki 4:39, gephen sadheh English Versions of the Bible "wild vine"; De 32:32, gephen cedhom, "vine of Sodom."

(2) soreq, in Isa 5:2, "choicest vine"; soreq, in Jer 2:21, "noble vine"; soreqah, in Ge 49:11, "choice vine"; compare SOREK, VALLEY OF (which see). The Hebrew is supposed to indicate dark grapes and, according to rabbinical tradition, they were unusually sweet and almost, if not quite, stoneless.

(3) nazir, in Le 25:5,11, "undressed vine," the King James Version "vine undressed," margin "separation." This may mean an unpruned vine and be a reference to the uncut locks of a Nazirite, but it is equally probable that nazir should be batsir, "vintage."

For the blossom we have peraq (Isa 18:5), "blossom"; nitstsah, either the blossom or half-formed clusters of grapes (Ge 40:10; Isa 18:5); cemadhar, "sweet-scented blossom" (So 2:13,15; 7:12).

For grapes we have commonly: `enabh (a word common to all Semitic languages) (Ge 40:10; De 32:14; Isa 5:2, etc.); dam `anabhim, literally, "blood of grapes," i.e. wine (Ge 49:11); bocer, "the unripe grape" (Isa 18:5, "ripening grape," the King James Version "sour grape"; Job 15:33, "unripe grapes"; Jer 31:29 f; Eze 18:2, "sour grapes"); be'ushim "wild grapes" (Isa 5:2,4; see GRAPES, WILD); 'eshkol, a "cluster" of ripe grapes (Ge 40:10; So 7:8; Hab 3:17, etc.; compare ESHCOL (which see)); qartsannim, usually supposed to be the kernels of grapes (Nu 6:4).

2. Greek and Latin:

In Greek we have ampelos, "vine" (Mt 26:29, etc.), staphule (Sirach 39:26, "blood of grapes"; Mt 7:16, "grapes," etc.), and botrus (Re 14:18), "cluster of the vine." In the Latin of 2 Esdras vinea is "vine" in 5:23 ("vineyard" in 16:30,43); botrus (9:21) and racemus (16:30) are "cluster"; acinium (9:21) and uva (16:26) are "a grape."

3. Antiquity and Importance:

Palestine appears to have been a vine-growing country from the earliest historic times. The countless wine presses found in and around centers of early civilization witness to this. It is probable that the grape was largely cultivated as a source of sugar: the juice expressed in the "wine press" was reduced by boiling to a liquid of treacle-like consistency known as "grape honey," or in Hebrew debhash (Arabic, dibs). This is doubtless the "honey" of many Old Testament references, and before the days of cane sugar was the chief source of sugar. The whole Old Testament witnesses to how greatly Palestine depended upon the vine and its products. Men rejoiced in wine also as one of God's best gifts (Jud 9:13; Ps 104:15). But the Nazirite might eat nothing of the vine "from the kernels even to the husk" (Nu 6:4; Jud 13:14).

The land promised to the children of Israel was one of "vines and fig trees and pomegranates" (De 8:8); they inherited vineyards which they had not planted (De 6:11; Jos 24:13; Ne 9:25). Jacob's blessing on Judah had much reference to the suitability of his special part of the land to the vine (Ge 49:11). When the leading people were carried captive the poor were left as vine dressers (2Ki 25:12; Jer 52:16), lest the whole land should lapse into uncultivated wilderness. On the promised return this humble duty was, however, to fall to the "sons of the alien" (Isa 61:5 the King James Version).

4. Its Cultivation:

The mountain regions of Judea and Samaria, often little suited to cereals, have always proved highly adapted to vine culture. The stones must first be gathered out and utilized for the construction of a protecting wall or of terraces or as the bases of towers (Isa 5:2; Mt 21:33). Every ancient vineyard had its wine press cut in a sheet of rock appearing at the surface. As a rule the vinestocks lie along the ground, many of the fruit-bearing branches falling over the terraces (compare Ge 49:22); in some districts the end of the vine-stock is raised by means of a cleft stick a foot or more above the surface; exceptionally the vine branches climb into trees, and before a dwelling-house they are sometimes supported upon poles to form a bower (compare 1Ki 4:25, etc.).

The cultivation of the vine requires constant care or the fruit will very soon degenerate. After the rains the loosely made walls require to have breaches repaired; the ground must be plowed or harrowed and cleared of weeds--contrast with this the vineyard of the sluggard (Pr 24:30-31); in the early spring the plants must be pruned by cutting off dead and fruitless branches (Le 25:3,4; Isa 5:6) which are gathered and burned (Joh 15:6). As the grapes ripen they must be watched to keep off jackals and foxes (So 2:15), and in some districts even wild boars (Ps 80:13). The watchman is stationed in one of the towers and overlooks a considerable area. When the grape season comes, the whole family of the owner frequently take their residence in a booth constructed upon one of the larger towers and remain there until the grapes are practically finished. It is a time of special happiness (compare Isa 16:10). The gleanings are left to the poor of the village or town (Le 19:10; De 24:21; Jud 8:2; Isa 17:6; 24:13; Jer 49:9; Mic 7:1). In the late summer the vineyards are a beautiful mass of green, as contrasted with the dried-up parched land around, but in the autumn the leaves are sere and yellow (Isa 34:4), and the place desolate.

5. Vine of Sodom:

The expression "vine of Sodom" (De 32:32) has been supposed, especially because of the description in Josephus (BJ, IV, viii, 4), to refer to the colocynth (Citrullus colocynthis), but it is far more probable that it means "a vine whose juices and fruits were not fresh and healthy, but tainted by the corruption of which Sodom was the type" (Driver, Commentary on Deuteronomy).

See SODOM, VINE OF.

Figurative: Every man "under his vine and under his fig-tree" (1Ki 4:25; Mic 4:4; Zec 3:10) was a sign of national peace and prosperity. To plant vineyards and eat the fruit thereof implied long and settled habitation (2Ki 19:29; Ps 107:37; Isa 37:30; 65:21; Jer 31:5; Eze 28:26; Am 9:14); to plant and not eat the fruit was a misfortune (De 20:6; compare 1Co 9:7) and might be a sign of God's displeasure (De 28:30; Ze 1:13; Am 5:11). Not to plant vines might be a sign of deliberate avoidance of permanent habitation (Jer 35:7). A successful and prolonged vintage showed God's blessing (Le 26:5), and a fruitful wife is compared to a vine (Ps 128:3); a failure of the vine was a sign of God's wrath (Ps 78:47; Jer 8:13; Joe 1:7); it might be a test of faith in Him (Hab 3:17). Joseph "is a fruitful bough, .... his branches run over the wall" (Ge 49:22). Israel is a vine (Isa 5:1-5) brought out of Egypt (Ps 80:8 f; Jer 2:21; 12:10; compare Eze 15:2,6; 17:6). At a later period vine leaves or grape clusters figure prominently on Jewish coins or in architecture.

Three of our Lord's parables are connected with vineyards (Mt 20:1 ff; 21:28,33 ), and He has made the vine ever sacred in Christian symbolism by His teaching regarding the true vine (Joh 15).

E. W. G. Masterman

Moby Thesaurus

algae, autophyte, bean, bittersweet, bracken, brown algae, clematis, climber, conferva, confervoid, creeper, dewberry, diatom, fern, fruits and vegetables, fucus, fungus, grape, grapevine, green algae, greenbrier, gulfweed, herb, heterophyte, honeysuckle, hop, ivy, jasmine, kelp, legume, lentil, liana, lichen, liverwort, mold, moss, mushroom, parasite, parasitic plant, pea, perthophyte, phytoplankton, planktonic algae, plant families, poison ivy, puffball, pulse, red algae, rockweed, rust, saprophyte, sargasso, sargassum, sea lentil, sea moss, sea wrack, seaweed, smut, succulent, toadstool, trumpet creeper, vetch, wisteria, wort, wrack



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