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tribromoethyl alcohol
tribromomethane
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Tribune definitions

Webster's 1828 Dictionary

TRIB'UNE, n. [L. tribunus, from tribus, tribe.]
1. In ancient Rome, an officer or magistrate chosen by the people to protect them from the oppression of the patricians or nobles, and to defend their liberties against any attempts that might be made upon them by the senate and consuls. These magistrates were at first two, but their number was increased ultimately to ten. There were also military tribunes, officers of the army, each of whom commanded a division or legion. In the year of Rome 731, the senate transferred the authority of the tribunes to Augustus and his successors. There were also other officers called tribunes; as tribunes of the treasury, of the horse, of the making of arms, etc.
2. In France, a pulpit or elevated place in the chamber of deputies, where a speaker stands to address the assembly.

WordNet (r) 3.0 (2005)

n
1: (ancient Rome) an official elected by the plebeians to protect their interests
2: the apse of a Christian church that contains the bishop's throne

Merriam Webster's

I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Latin tribunus, from tribus tribe Date: 14th century 1. a Roman official under the monarchy and the republic with the function of protecting the plebeian citizen from arbitrary action by the patrician magistrates 2. an unofficial defender of the rights of the individual tribuneship noun II. noun Etymology: French, from Italian tribuna, from Latin tribunal Date: circa 1771 a dais or platform from which an assembly is addressed

Britannica Concise

In ancient Rome, any of various military and civil officials. Military tribunes were originally infantry commanders. In the early republic, there were six to a legion; some were appointed by consuls or military commanders, others elected by the people. During the Roman empire (from 27 BC), the emperor nominated military tribunes, the office of which was considered preliminary to a senatorial or equestrian career (see eques). Of the civil tribunes, the most important were the tribunes of the plebs (see plebeian), who were elected in the plebeian assembly. By 450 there were 10 plebeian tribunes, who were elected annually with the right to intervene in cases of unjust acts of consuls or magistrates by saying Veto ("I forbid it"). The office became powerful; its powers were curtailed by Sulla, but restored by Pompey. Under the empire, the plebeian tribunes' power passed to the emperor.

Oxford Reference Dictionary

1. n. 1 a popular leader or demagogue. 2 (in full tribune of the people) an official in ancient Rome chosen by the people to protect their interests. 3 (in full military tribune) a Roman legionary officer. Derivatives: tribunate n. tribuneship n. Etymology: ME f. L tribunus, prob. f. tribus tribe 2. n. 1 a a bishop's throne in a basilica. b an apse containing this. 2 a dais or rostrum. 3 a raised area with seats. Etymology: F f. It. f. med.L tribuna TRIBUNAL

Webster's 1913 Dictionary

Tribune Trib"une, n. [L. tribunus, properly, the chief of a tribe, fr. tribus tribe: cf. F. tribun. See Tribe.] 1. (Rom. Antiq.) An officer or magistrate chosen by the people, to protect them from the oppression of the patricians, or nobles, and to defend their liberties against any attempts that might be made upon them by the senate and consuls. Note: The tribunes were at first two, but their number was increased ultimately to ten. There were also military tribunes, officers of the army, of whom there were from four to six in each legion. Other officers were also called tribunes; as, tribunes of the treasury, etc. 2. Anciently, a bench or elevated place, from which speeches were delivered; in France, a kind of pulpit in the hall of the legislative assembly, where a member stands while making an address; any place occupied by a public orator.

Moby Thesaurus

Areopagite, archon, balcony, catafalque, dais, deemster, dempster, doomsman, doomster, emplacement, estrade, floor, gallery, heliport, hustings, justiciar, justiciary, landing, landing pad, landing stage, launching pad, platform, podesta, podium, praetor, pulpit, rostrum, soapbox, stage, step terrace, stump, syndic, terrace, tribunal



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