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Wordswarms From Years Past


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Adjacent Words

To set one's teeth
To set or To set up
To set out
To set over
To set right
To set sail
To set steven
To set store by
To set the eyes on
To set the fashion
To set the hand to
To set the heart at rest
To set the heart upon
To set the land
To set the palette
To set the watch
To set to
To set to rights
To set to sale
To set to work
To set up
To set up the rigging
To settle on
To settle the land
To shake a cask
To shake hands
To shake out a reef
To shake the bells
To shake the sails
To sham Abraham

To set the teeth on edge definitions

Webster's 1913 Dictionary

To set over. (a) To appoint or constitute as supervisor, inspector, ruler, or commander. (b) To assign; to transfer; to convey. To set right, to correct; to put in order. To set sail. (Naut.) See under Sail, n. To set store by, to consider valuable. To set the fashion, to determine what shall be the fashion; to establish the mode. To set the teeth on edge, to affect the teeth with a disagreeable sensation, as when acids are brought in contact with them. To set the watch (Naut.), to place the starboard or port watch on duty. To set to, to attach to; to affix to. ``He . . . hath set to his seal that God is true.'' --John iii. 33. To set up. (a) To erect; to raise; to elevate; as, to set up a building, or a machine; to set up a post, a wall, a pillar. (b) Hence, to exalt; to put in power. ``I will . . . set up the throne of David over Israel.'' --2 Sam. iii. 10. (c) To begin, as a new institution; to institute; to establish; to found; as, to set up a manufactory; to set up a school. (d) To enable to commence a new business; as, to set up a son in trade. (e) To place in view; as, to set up a mark. (f) To raise; to utter loudly; as, to set up the voice. I'll set up such a note as she shall hear. --Dryden. (g) To advance; to propose as truth or for reception; as, to set up a new opinion or doctrine. --T. Burnet. (h) To raise from depression, or to a sufficient fortune; as, this good fortune quite set him up. (i) To intoxicate. [Slang] (j) (Print.) To put in type; as, to set up copy; to arrange in words, lines, etc., ready for printing; as, to set up type. To set up the rigging (Naut.), to make it taut by means of tackles. --R. H. Dana, Jr. Syn: See Put.

Webster's 1913 Dictionary

Edge Edge, n. [OE. eg, egge, AS. ecg; akin to OHG. ekka, G. ecke, Icel. & Sw. egg, Dan. eg, and to L. acies, Gr. ? point, Skr. a?ri edge. ??. Cf. Egg, v. t., Eager, Ear spike of corn, Acute.] 1. The thin cutting side of the blade of an instrument; as, the edge of an ax, knife, sword, or scythe. Hence, figuratively, that which cuts as an edge does, or wounds deeply, etc. He which hath the sharp sword with two edges. --Rev. ii. 12. Slander, Whose edge is sharper than the sword. --Shak. 2. Any sharp terminating border; a margin; a brink; extreme verge; as, the edge of a table, a precipice. Upon the edge of yonder coppice. --Shak. In worst extremes, and on the perilous edge Of battle. --Milton. Pursue even to the very edge of destruction. --Sir W. Scott. 3. Sharpness; readiness of fitness to cut; keenness; intenseness of desire. The full edge of our indignation. --Sir W. Scott. Death and persecution lose all the ill that they can have, if we do not set an edge upon them by our fears and by our vices. --Jer. Taylor. 4. The border or part adjacent to the line of division; the beginning or early part; as, in the edge of evening. ``On the edge of winter.'' --Milton. Edge joint (Carp.), a joint formed by two edges making a corner. Edge mill, a crushing or grinding mill in which stones roll around on their edges, on a level circular bed; -- used for ore, and as an oil mill. Called also Chilian mill. Edge molding (Arch.), a molding whose section is made up of two curves meeting in an angle. Edge plane. (a) (Carp.) A plane for edging boards. (b) (Shoemaking) A plane for edging soles. Edge play, a kind of swordplay in which backswords or cutlasses are used, and the edge, rather than the point, is employed. Edge rail. (Railroad) (a) A rail set on edge; -- applied to a rail of more depth than width. (b) A guard rail by the side of the main rail at a switch. --Knight. Edge railway, a railway having the rails set on edge. Edge stone, a curbstone. Edge tool. (a) Any tool instrument having a sharp edge intended for cutting. (b) A tool for forming or dressing an edge; an edging tool. To be on edge, to be eager, impatient, or anxious. To set the teeth on edge, to cause a disagreeable tingling sensation in the teeth, as by bringing acids into contact with them. --Bacon.



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