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To run a risk
To run afoul of
To run after
To run amuck
To run away
To run away with
To run down
To run down a coast
To run for an office
To run hard
To run in
To run in trust
To run in with
To run into the ground
To run mad
To run off
To run on
To run out
To run over
To run riot
To run the gantlet
To run the guard
To run through
To run to seed
To run up
To run upon sorts
To run wild
To run with
To sag to leeward
To sail fine

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To run mad after definitions

Webster's 1913 Dictionary

Mad Mad, a. [Compar. Madder; superl. Maddest.] [AS. gem?d, gem[=a]d, mad; akin to OS. gem?d foolish, OHG. gameit, Icel. mei?a to hurt, Goth. gam['a]ids weak, broken. ?.] 1. Disordered in intellect; crazy; insane. I have heard my grandsire say full oft, Extremity of griefs would make men mad. --Shak. 2. Excited beyond self-control or the restraint of reason; inflamed by violent or uncontrollable desire, passion, or appetite; as, to be mad with terror, lust, or hatred; mad against political reform. It is the land of graven images, and they are mad upon their idols. --Jer. 1. 88. And being exceedingly mad against them, I persecuted them even unto strange cities. --Acts xxvi. 11. 3. Proceeding from, or indicating, madness; expressing distraction; prompted by infatuation, fury, or extreme rashness. ``Mad demeanor.'' --Milton. Mad wars destroy in one year the works of many years of peace. --Franklin. The mad promise of Cleon was fulfilled. --Jowett (Thucyd.). 4. Extravagant; immoderate. ``Be mad and merry.'' --Shak. ``Fetching mad bounds.'' --Shak. 5. Furious with rage, terror, or disease; -- said of the lower animals; as, a mad bull; esp., having hydrophobia; rabid; as, a mad dog. 6. Angry; out of patience; vexed; as, to get mad at a person. [Colloq.] 7. Having impaired polarity; -- applied to a compass needle. [Colloq.] Like mad, like a mad person; in a furious manner; as, to run like mad. --L'Estrange. To run mad. (a) To become wild with excitement. (b) To run wildly about under the influence of hydrophobia; to become affected with hydrophobia. To run mad after, to pursue under the influence of infatuation or immoderate desire. ``The world is running mad after farce.'' --Dryden.

Webster's 1913 Dictionary

(b) To decline in condition; as, to run down in health. To run down a coast, to sail along it. To run for an office, to stand as a candidate for an office. To run in or into. (a) To enter; to step in. (b) To come in collision with. To run in trust, to run in debt; to get credit. [Obs.] To run in with. (a) To close; to comply; to agree with. [R.] --T. Baker. (b) (Naut.) To make toward; to near; to sail close to; as, to run in with the land. To run mad, To run mad after or on. See under Mad. To run on. (a) To be continued; as, their accounts had run on for a year or two without a settlement. (b) To talk incessantly. (c) To continue a course. (d) To press with jokes or ridicule; to abuse with sarcasm; to bear hard on. (e) (Print.) To be continued in the same lines, without making a break or beginning a new paragraph. To run out. (a) To come to an end; to expire; as, the lease runs out at Michaelmas. (b) To extend; to spread. ``Insectile animals . . . run all out into legs.'' --Hammond. (c) To expatiate; as, to run out into beautiful digressions. (d) To be wasted or exhausted; to become poor; to become extinct; as, an estate managed without economy will soon run out. And had her stock been less, no doubt She must have long ago run out. --Dryden. To run over. (a) To overflow; as, a cup runs over, or the liquor runs over. (b) To go over, examine, or rehearse cursorily. (c) To ride or drive over; as, to run over a child. To run riot, to go to excess. To run through. (a) To go through hastily; as to run through a book. (b) To spend wastefully; as, to run through an estate. To run to seed, to expend or exhaust vitality in producing seed, as a plant; figuratively and colloquially, to cease growing; to lose vital force, as the body or mind. To run up, to rise; to swell; to grow; to increase; as, accounts of goods credited run up very fast. But these, having been untrimmed for many years, had run up into great bushes, or rather dwarf trees. --Sir W. Scott. To run with. (a) To be drenched with, so that streams flow; as, the streets ran with blood. (b) To flow while charged with some foreign substance. ``Its rivers ran with gold.'' --J. H. Newman.



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