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To put away
To put back
To put by
To put down
To put forth
To put forward
To put in
To put in an appearance
To put in for
To put in mind
To put in one's oar
To put in pledge
To put in possession
To put into the chair
To put off
To put on one's trumps
To put one one's mettle
To put one out of conceit with
To put one's foot down
To put one's legs under some one's mahogany
To put one's nose out of joint
To put or throw one's self upon the country
To put out
To put out of court
To put out of the way
To put out to grass
To put out to nurse
To put over
To put stress upon
To put the

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To put on definitions

Webster's 1913 Dictionary

. (e) To push from land; as, to put off a boat. To put on or upon. (a) To invest one's self with, as clothes; to assume. ``Mercury . . . put on the shape of a man.'' --L'Estrange. (b) To impute (something) to; to charge upon; as, to put blame on or upon another. (c) To advance; to promote. [Obs.] ``This came handsomely to put on the peace.'' --Bacon. (d) To impose; to inflict. ``That which thou puttest on me, will I bear.'' --2 Kings xviii. 14. (e) To apply; as, to put on workmen; to put on steam. (f) To deceive; to trick. ``The stork found he was put upon.'' --L'Estrange. (g) To place upon, as a means or condition; as, he put him upon bread and water. ``This caution will put them upon considering.'' --Locke. (h) (Law) To rest upon; to submit to; as, a defendant puts himself on or upon the country. --Burrill. To put out. (a) To eject; as, to put out and intruder. (b) To put forth; to shoot, as a bud, or sprout. (c) To extinguish; as, to put out a candle, light, or fire. (d) To place at interest; to loan; as, to put out funds. (e) To provoke, as by insult; to displease; to vex; as, he was put out by my reply. [Colloq.] (f) To protrude; to stretch forth; as, to put out the hand. (g) To publish; to make public; as, to put out a pamphlet. (h) To confuse; to disconcert; to interrupt; as, to put one out in reading or speaking. (i) (Law) To open; as, to put out lights, that is, to open or cut windows. --Burrill. (j) (Med.) To place out of joint; to dislocate; as, to put out the ankle. (k) To cause to cease playing, or to prevent from playing longer in a certain inning, as in base ball. To put over. (a) To place (some one) in authority over; as, to put a general over a division of an army. (b) To refer. For the certain knowledge of that truth I put you o'er to heaven and to my mother. --Shak. (c) To defer; to postpone; as, the court put over the cause to the next term. (d) To transfer (a person or thing) across; as, to put one over the river. To put the hand to or unto. (a) To take hold of, as of an instrument of labor; as, to put the hand to the plow; hence, to engage in (any task or affair); as, to put one's hand to the work. (b) To take or seize, as in theft. ``He hath not put his hand unto his neighbor's goods.'' --Ex. xxii. 11. To put through, to cause to go through all conditions or stages of a progress; hence, to push to completion; to accomplish; as, he put through a measure of legislation; he put through a railroad enterprise. [U.S.] To put to. (a) To add; to unite; as, to put one sum to another. (b) To refer to; to expose; as, to put the safety of the state to hazard. ``That dares not put it to the touch.'' --Montrose. (c) To attach (something) to; to harness beasts to. --Dickens. To put to a stand, to stop; to arrest by obstacles or difficulties. To put to bed. (a) To undress and place in bed, as a child. (b) To deliver in, or to make ready for, childbirth. To put to death, to kill. To put together, to attach; to aggregate; to unite in one. To put this and that (or two and two) together, to draw an inference; to form a correct conclusion. To put to it, to distress; to press hard; to perplex; to give difficulty to. ``O gentle lady, do not put me to 't.'' --Shak. To put to rights, to arrange in proper order; to settle or compose rightly. To put to the sword, to kill with the sword; to slay. To put to trial, or on trial, to bring to a test; to try. To put trust in, to confide in; to repose confidence in. To put up. (a) To pass unavenged; to overlook; not to punish or resent; to put up with; as, to put up indignities. [Obs.] ``Such national injuries are not to be put up.'' --Addison. (b) To send forth or upward; as, to put up goods for sale. (d) To start from a cover, as game. ``She has been frightened; she has been put up.'' --C. Kingsley. (e) To hoard. ``Himself never put up any of the rent.'' --Spelman. (f) To lay side or preserve; to pack away; to store; to pickle; as, to put up pork, beef, or fish. (g) To place out of sight, or away; to put in its proper place; as, put up that letter. --Shak. (h) To incite; to instigate; -- followed by to; as, he put the lad up to mischief. (i) To raise; to erect; to build; as, to put up a tent, or a house. (j) To lodge; to entertain; as, to put up travelers. To put up a job, to arrange a plot. [Slang] Syn: To place; set; lay; cause; produce; propose; state. Usage: Put, Lay, Place, Set. These words agree in the idea of fixing the position of some object, and are often used interchangeably. To put is the least definite, denoting merely to move to a place. To place has more particular reference to the precise location, as to put with care in a certain or proper place. To set or to lay may be used when there is special reference to the position of the object.

Webster's 1913 Dictionary

Put Put (put; often p[u^]t in def. 3), v. i. 1. To go or move; as, when the air first puts up. [Obs.] --Bacon. 2. To steer; to direct one's course; to go. His fury thus appeased, he puts to land. --Dryden. 3. To play a card or a hand in the game called put. To put about (Naut.), to change direction; to tack. To put back (Naut.), to turn back; to return. ``The French . . . had put back to Toulon.'' --Southey. To put forth. (a) To shoot, bud, or germinate. ``Take earth from under walls where nettles put forth.'' --Bacon. (b) To leave a port or haven, as a ship. --Shak. To put in (Naut.), to enter a harbor; to sail into port. To put in for. (a) To make a request or claim; as, to put in for a share of profits. (b) To go into covert; -- said of a bird escaping from a hawk. (c) To offer one's self; to stand as a candidate for. --Locke. To put off, to go away; to depart; esp., to leave land, as a ship; to move from the shore. To put on, to hasten motion; to drive vehemently. To put over (Naut.), to sail over or across. To put to sea (Naut.), to set sail; to begin a voyage; to advance into the ocean. To put up. (a) To take lodgings; to lodge. (b) To offer one's self as a candidate. --L'Estrange.



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