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Testimony definitions

Webster's 1828 Dictionary

TEST'IMONY, n. [L. testimonium.] A solemn declaration or affirmation made for the purpose of establishing or proving some fact. Such affirmation in judicial proceedings,may be verbal or written, but must be under oath. Testimony differs from evidence; testimony is the declaration of a witness, and evidence is the effect of that declaration on the mind, or the degree of light which it affords.
1. Affirmation; declaration. These doctrines are supported by the uniform testimony of the fathers. The belief of past facts must depend on the evidence of human testimony, or the testimony of historians.
2. Open attestation; profession.
Thou for the testimony of truth hast borne
Universal reproach.
3. Witness; evidence; proof of some fact.
Shake off the dust under your feet, for a testimony against them. Mark 6.
4. In Scripture, the two tables of the law.
Thou shalt put into the ark the testimony which I shall give thee. Exodus 25.
5. The book of the law.
He brought forth the king's son--and gave him the testimony. 2 Kings 11.
6. The gospel, which testifies of Christ and declares the will of God. 1 Corinthians 2. 2 Timothy 1.
7. The ark. Exodus 16.
8. The word of God; the Scriptures.
The testimony of the Lord is sure, making wise the simple Psalms 19.
9. The laws or precepts of God. "I love thy testimonies." "I have kept thy testimonies."
10. That which is equivalent to a declaration; manifestation.
Sacrifices were appointed by God for a testimony of his hatred of sin.
11. Evidence suggested to the mind; as the testimony of conscience. 2 Corinthians 1.
12. Attestation; confirmation.
TEST'IMONY, v.t. To witness. [Not in use.]

WordNet (r) 3.0 (2005)

n
1: a solemn statement made under oath
2: an assertion offering firsthand authentication of a fact; "according to his own testimony he can't do it"
3: something that serves as evidence; "his effort was testimony to his devotion" [syn: testimony, testimonial]

Merriam Webster's

noun (plural -nies) Etymology: Middle English testimonie, from Anglo-French, from Late Latin & Latin; Late Latin testimonium Decalogue, from Latin, evidence, witness, from testis witness more at testament Date: 14th century 1. a. (1) the tablets inscribed with the Mosaic law (2) the ark containing the tablets b. a divine decree attested in the Scriptures 2. a. firsthand authentication of a fact ; evidence b. an outward sign c. a solemn declaration usually made orally by a witness under oath in response to interrogation by a lawyer or authorized public official 3. a. an open acknowledgment b. a public profession of religious experience

Oxford Reference Dictionary

n. (pl. -ies) 1 Law an oral or written statement under oath or affirmation. 2 declaration or statement of fact. 3 evidence, demonstration (called him in testimony; produce testimony). 4 Bibl. the Ten Commandments. 5 archaic a solemn protest or confession. Etymology: ME f. L testimonium f. testis witness

Webster's 1913 Dictionary

Testimony Tes"ti*mo*ny, n.; pl. Testimonies. [L. testimonium, from testis a witness: cf. OF. testimoine, testemoine, testimonie. See Testify.] 1. A solemn declaration or affirmation made for the purpose of establishing or proving some fact. Note: Such declaration, in judicial proceedings, may be verbal or written, but must be under oath or affirmation. 2. Affirmation; declaration; as, these doctrines are supported by the uniform testimony of the fathers; the belief of past facts must depend on the evidence of human testimony, or the testimony of historians. 3. Open attestation; profession. [Thou] for the testimony of truth, hast borne Universal reproach. --Milton. 4. Witness; evidence; proof of some fact. When ye depart thence, shake off the dust under your feet for a testimony against them. --Mark vi. 11. 5. (Jewish Antiq.) The two tables of the law. Thou shalt put into the ark the testimony which I shall give thee. --Ex. xxv. 16. 6. Hence, the whole divine revelation; the sacre? Scriptures. The testimony of the Lord is sure, making wise the simple. --Ps. xix. 7. Syn: Proof; evidence; attestation; witness; affirmation; confirmation; averment. Usage: Testimony, Proof, Evidence. Proof is the most familiar, and is used more frequently (though not exclusively) of facts and things which occur in the ordinary concerns of life. Evidence is a word of more dignity, and is more generally applied to that which is moral or intellectual; as, the evidences of Christianity, etc. Testimony is what is deposed to by a witness on oath or affirmation. When used figuratively or in a wider sense, the word testimony has still a reference to some living agent as its author, as when we speak of the testimony of conscience, or of doing a thing in testimony of our affection, etc. Testimony refers rather to the thing declared, evidence to its value or effect. ``To conform our language more to common use, we ought to divide arguments into demonstrations, proofs, and probabilities; ba proofs, meaning such arguments from experience as leave no room for doubt or opposition.'' --Hume. ``The evidence of sense is the first and highest kind of evidence of which human nature is capable.'' --Bp. Wilkins. ``The proof of everything must be by the testimony of such as the parties produce.'' --Spenser.

Webster's 1913 Dictionary

Testimony Tes"ti*mo*ny, v. t. To witness; to attest; to prove by testimony. [Obs.] --Shak.

Collin's Cobuild Dictionary

(testimonies) 1. In a court of law, someone's testimony is a formal statement that they make about what they saw someone do or what they know of a situation, after having promised to tell the truth. His testimony was an important element of the Prosecution case... N-VAR: oft poss N 2. If you say that one thing is testimony to another, you mean that it shows clearly that the second thing has a particular quality. This book is testimony to a very individual kind of courage. N-UNCOUNT: also a N, usu N to n

Easton's Bible Dictionary

(1.) Witness or evidence (2 Thess. 1:10).

(2.) The Scriptures, as the revelation of God's will (2 Kings 11:12; Ps. 19:7; 119:88; Isa. 8:16, 20).

(3.) The altar raised by the Gadites and Reubenites (Josh. 22:10).

Soule's Dictionary of English Synonyms

n. 1. Affirmation, declaration, deposition, attestation. 2. Affirmation, confirmation, declaration, corroboration. 3. Profession, open attestation. 4. Proof (by a witness), evidence, witness, ground of belief. 5. Manifestation, expression. 6. Sacred Scriptures, divine revelation.

Moby Thesaurus

admission, affidavit, affirmation, allegation, argument, assertion, asseveration, attest, attestation, authentication, averment, avouchment, avowal, certification, claim, compurgation, confirmation, corroboration, declaration, demonstration, deposition, disclosure, documentation, evidence, illustration, information, instrument in proof, legal evidence, notarized statement, profession, proof, statement, statement under oath, substantiation, summation, summing up, swearing, sworn evidence, sworn statement, sworn testimony, testament, testimonial, testimonium, verification, vouching, witness, word



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