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Wordswarms From Years Past


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Adjacent Words

SMA
Smack
smack of
smack-dab
Smacked
smacker
smacking
SMaj
small ad
small arm
small arms
small arms ammunition
small beer
small boat
Small bower
Small buckeye
Small Business Administration
small businessman
small calorie
small cane
small cap
small capital

Small definitions

Webster's 1828 Dictionary

SMALL, a.
1. Slender; thin; fine; of little diameter; hence in general, litte in size or quantity; not great; as a small house; a small horse; a small farm; a small body; small particles.
2. Minute; slender; fine; as a small voice.
3. Little in degree; as small improvement; small acquirements; the trouble is small. Ther arose no small stir about that way. Acts 9.
4. Being of little moment, weight or importance; as, it is a small matter or thing; a small subject.
5. Of little genius or ability; petty; as a small poet or musician.
6. Short; containing little; as a small essay.
7. Little in amount; as a small sum; a small price.
8. Containing little of the principal quality, or little strenghth; weak; as small beer.
9. Gentle; soft; not loud. I Kings 19.
10. Mean; base; unworthy.
SMALL, n. The small or slender part of a thing; as the small of the leg or of the back.
SMALL, v.t. To make little or less. [Not in use.]

WordNet (r) 3.0 (2005)

adj
1: limited or below average in number or quantity or magnitude or extent; "a little dining room"; "a little house"; "a small car"; "a little (or small) group" [syn: small, little] [ant: big, large]
2: limited in size or scope; "a small business"; "a newspaper with a modest circulation"; "small-scale plans"; "a pocket- size country" [syn: minor, modest, small, small- scale, pocket-size, pocket-sized]
3: (of children and animals) young, immature; "what a big little boy you are"; "small children" [syn: little, small]
4: slight or limited; especially in degree or intensity or scope; "a series of death struggles with small time in between"
5: low or inferior in station or quality; "a humble cottage"; "a lowly parish priest"; "a modest man of the people"; "small beginnings" [syn: humble, low, lowly, modest, small]
6: lowercase; "little a"; "small a"; "e.e.cummings's poetry is written all in minuscule letters" [syn: little, minuscule, small]
7: (of a voice) faint; "a little voice"; "a still small voice" [syn: little, small]
8: have fine or very small constituent particles; "a small misty rain"
9: not large but sufficient in size or amount; "a modest salary"; "modest inflation"; "helped in my own small way" [syn: modest, small]
10: made to seem smaller or less (especially in worth); "her comments made me feel small" [syn: belittled, diminished, small] n
1: the slender part of the back
2: a garment size for a small person adv
1: on a small scale; "think small" [ant: big]

Merriam Webster's

I. adjective Etymology: Middle English smal, from Old English smæl; akin to Old High German smal small, Greek m?lon small domestic animal Date: before 12th century 1. a. having comparatively little size or slight dimensions b. lowercase 2. a. minor in influence, power, or rank b. operating on a limited scale 3. lacking in strength <a small voice> 4. a. little or close to zero in an objectively measurable aspect (as quantity, amount, or value) b. made up of few or little units 5. a. of little consequence ; trivial, insignificant <a small problem> b. humble, modest <a small beginning> 6. limited in degree 7. a. mean, petty b. reduced to a humiliating position • smallish adjectivesmallness noun Synonyms: small, little, diminutive, minute, tiny, miniature mean noticeably below average in size. small and little are often interchangeable, but small applies more to relative size determined by capacity, value, number <a relatively small backyard>. little is more absolute in implication often carrying the idea of petiteness, pettiness, insignificance, or immaturity <your pathetic little smile>. diminutive implies abnormal smallness <diminutive bonsai plants>. minute implies extreme smallness <a minute amount of caffeine in the soda>. tiny is an informal equivalent to minute <tiny cracks formed in the painting>. miniature applies to an exactly proportioned reproduction on a very small scale <a dollhouse with miniature furnishings>. II. adverb Date: before 12th century 1. in or into small pieces 2. without force or loudness <speak as small as you will — Shakespeare> 3. in a small manner III. noun Date: 14th century 1. a part smaller and especially narrower than the remainder <the small of the back> 2. a. plural small-sized products b. plural, chiefly British smallclothes; especially underwear

Oxford Reference Dictionary

adj., n., & adv. --adj. 1 not large or big. 2 slender; thin. 3 not great in importance, amount, number, strength, or power. 4 not much; trifling (a small token; paid small attention). 5 insignificant; unimportant (a small matter; from small beginnings). 6 consisting of small particles (small gravel; small shot). 7 doing something on a small scale (a small farmer). 8 socially undistinguished; poor or humble. 9 petty; mean; ungenerous; paltry (a small spiteful nature). 10 young; not fully grown or developed (a small child). --n. 1 the slenderest part of something (esp. small of the back). 2 (in pl.) Brit. colloq. small items of laundry, esp. underwear. --adv. into small pieces (chop it small). Phrases and idioms: feel (or look) small be humiliated; appear mean or humiliated. in a small way unambitiously; on a small scale. no small considerable; a good deal of (no small excitement about it). small arms portable firearms, esp. rifles, pistols, light machine-guns, sub-machine-guns, etc. small beer 1 a trifling matter; something unimportant. 2 weak beer. small-bore (of a firearm) with a narrow bore, in international and Olympic shooting usu. .22 inch calibre (5.6 millimetre bore). small capital a capital letter which is of the same dimensions as the lower-case letters in the same typeface minus ascenders and descenders, as THIS. small change 1 money in the form of coins as opposed to notes. 2 trivial remarks. small circle see CIRCLE. small claims court Brit. a local tribunal in which claims for small amounts can be heard and decided quickly and cheaply without legal representation. small craft a general term for small boats and fishing vessels. small fry 1 young children or the young of various species. 2 small or insignificant things or people. small hours the early hours of the morning after midnight. small intestine see INTESTINE. small letter (in printed material) a lower-case letter. small mercy a minor concession, benefit, etc. (be grateful for small mercies). small potatoes an insignificant person or thing. small print 1 printed matter in small type. 2 inconspicuous and usu. unfavourable limitations etc. in a contract. small profits and quick returns the policy of a cheap shop etc. relying on large trade. small-scale made or occurring in small amounts or to a lesser degree. small slam see SLAM(2). small-sword a light tapering thrusting-sword, esp. hist. for duelling. small talk light social conversation. small-time colloq. unimportant or petty. small-timer colloq. a small-time operator; an insignificant person. small-town relating to or characteristic of a small town; unsophisticated; provincial. small wonder not very surprising. Derivatives: smallish adj. smallness n. Etymology: OE smæl f. Gmc

Webster's 1913 Dictionary

Small Small, adv. 1. In or to small extent, quantity, or degree; little; slightly. [Obs.] ``I wept but small.'' --Chaucer. ``It small avails my mood.'' --Shak. 2. Not loudly; faintly; timidly. [Obs. or Humorous] You may speak as small as you will. --Shak.

Webster's 1913 Dictionary

Small Small, n. 1. The small or slender part of a thing; as, the small of the leg or of the back. 2. pl. Smallclothes. [Colloq.] --Hood. Dickens. 3. pl. Same as Little go. See under Little, a.

Webster's 1913 Dictionary

Small Small, v. t. To make little or less. [Obs.]

Webster's 1913 Dictionary

Small Small (sm[add]l), a. [Compar. Smaller; superl. Smallest.] [OE. small, AS. sm[ae]l; akin to D. smal narrow, OS. & OHG. smal small, G. schmal narrow, Dan. & Sw. smal, Goth. smals small, Icel. smali smal cattle, sheep, or goats; cf. Gr. mh^lon a sheep or goat.] 1. Having little size, compared with other things of the same kind; little in quantity or degree; diminutive; not large or extended in dimension; not great; not much; inconsiderable; as, a small man; a small river. To compare Great things with small. --Milton. 2. Being of slight consequence; feeble in influence or importance; unimportant; trivial; insignificant; as, a small fault; a small business. 3. Envincing little worth or ability; not large-minded; -- sometimes, in reproach, paltry; mean. A true delineation of the smallest man is capable of interesting the greatest man. --Carlyle.

Collin's Cobuild Dictionary

(smaller, smallest) Frequency: The word is one of the 700 most common words in English. 1. A small person, thing, or amount of something is not large in physical size. She is small for her age... The window was far too small for him to get through... Stick them on using a small amount of glue. ? large ADJsmallness Amy had not mentioned the smallness and bareness of Luis's home. ? largeness N-UNCOUNT 2. A small group or quantity consists of only a few people or things. A small group of students meets regularly to learn Japanese... Guns continued to be produced in small numbers. ? large ADJ 3. A small child is a very young child. I have a wife and two small children... What were you like when you were small? = young, little ADJ 4. You use small to describe something that is not significant or great in degree. It's quite easy to make quite small changes to the way that you work... No detail was too small to escape her attention... = minor ? major ADJ 5. Small businesses or companies employ a small number of people and do business with a small number of clients. ...shops, restaurants and other small businesses... ADJ 6. If someone makes you look or feel small, they make you look or feel stupid or ashamed. This may just be another of her schemes to make me look small... ADJ: v-link ADJ 7. The small of your back is the bottom part of your back that curves in slightly. Place your hands on the small of your back and breathe in. N-SING: the N of n 8. the small hours: see hour small wonder: see wonder see also smalls

Soule's Dictionary of English Synonyms

a. 1. Little, diminutive, tiny, puny. 2. Little, minute, microscopic, molecular, atomic, corpuscular, fine. 3. Petty, trifling, trivial, inconsiderable, insignificant, unimportant. 4. Slender, scanty, paltry, moderate. 5. Feeble, weak, faint, slight. 6. Mean, sordid, selfish, illiberal, ungenerous, narrow, narrow-minded, base, unworthy. 7. Shallow, unintelligent, unintellectual, ungifted, stolid, dull, feeble-minded, petty, insignificant, inferior. 8. Weak.

Moby Thesaurus

Lenten, Lilliputian, Spartan, abject, abominable, abstemious, airy, arrant, ascetic, atrocious, attenuate, attenuated, austere, authoritarian, baby, back-burner, bantam, base, beggarly, bigot, bigoted, borne, boyish, cheap, cheesy, close, closed, commonplace, constricted, contemptible, cramped, creedbound, crummy, cursory, deaf, deaf to reason, debased, deficient, degraded, delicate, depraved, depthless, despicable, diaphanous, diluted, diminished, diminutive, dinky, dirty, disgusting, dispensable, dwarfed, dwarfish, elfin, ethereal, everyday, execrable, exiguous, fanatical, few, fine, fine-drawn, finespun, flagrant, flat, flimsy, footling, foul, frail, frugal, fulsome, gauzy, girlish, gossamer, gracile, grave, gross, grudging, half-pint, heinous, hidebound, homely, humble, humble-looking, humble-visaged, humblest, illiberal, immaterial, immature, imperfect, impoverished, in a nutshell, in miniature, in the small, inadequate, inappreciable, incompetent, inconsequential, inconsiderable, inessential, inferior, inglorious, innocuous, insignificant, insubstantial, insufficient, insular, irrelevant, jejune, knee-high, lacy, lean, least, lesser, light, limited, little, little-minded, low, low-down, lowest, lowliest, lowly, lumpen, maladroit, mangy, matter-of-fact, meager, mean, mean-minded, mean-spirited, measly, mediocre, midget, mingy, mini, miniature, minor, minuscule, minute, miserable, miserly, misty, modest, monkey, monstrous, mundane, narrow, narrow-hearted, narrow-minded, narrow-souled, narrow-spirited, nearsighted, nefarious, negligible, niggardly, no great shakes, nonessential, not comparable, not in it, not vital, nugatory, obnoxious, odious, one-horse, out of it, paltry, papery, parochial, parsimonious, peewee, petit, petite, petty, picayune, picayunish, piddling, pindling, pint-sized, plain, pocket-sized, poky, poor, provincial, puny, purblind, rank, rare, rarefied, reduced, reptilian, scabby, scant, scanty, scrawny, scrimp, scrimpy, scrubby, scruffy, scummy, scurvy, secondary, selfish, shabby, shallow, shoddy, short, shortsighted, simple, skimp, skimpy, skin-deep, slender, slenderish, slight, slight-made, slightly, slim, slimmish, slinky, small-minded, small-scale, smallish, smally, spare, sparing, squalid, starvation, stingy, stinted, stinting, straitened, straitlaced, stuffy, stunted, subsistence, subtle, superficial, svelte, sylphlike, teachable, technical, teeny, tenuous, thin, thin-bodied, thin-set, thin-spun, thinnish, threadlike, tight, tight-fisted, tiny, trifling, trivial, two-by-four, two-dimensional, uncatholic, uncharitable, unchivalrous, undersized, undistinguished, unessential, ungenerous, unimaginative, unimportant, unimpressive, uninspired, unliberal, unmentionable, unnoteworthy, unnourishing, unnutritious, unoriginal, unpretentious, unprofound, unsatisfactory, unskillful, vague, vile, wasp-waisted, watered, watered-down, watery, weak, wee, willowy, wiredrawn, wispy, wretched, young



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