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Seedlip
Seedlop
seedman
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seedpod
Seeds
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seedtime
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Seedy toe
Seeger
Seeing Eye
Seeing Eye dog
seeing red
seeing-eye dog
Seek
seek after
seek out
seek time
Seek-no-further
Seek-sorrow
Seeker
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seeking

Seeing definitions

Webster's 1828 Dictionary

SEE'ING, ppr. [from see.] Perceiving by the eye; knowing; understanding; observing; beholding.
[Note. This participle appears to be used indefinitely, or without direct reference to a person or persons. "Wherefore come ye to me, seeing ye hate me.?" Genesis 26. That is, since, or the fact being that or thus; because that. In this form of phraseology, that is understood or implied after seeing; why come ye to me, seeing that, ye hate me? The resolution of the phrase or sentence is, ye hate me; that fact being seen or known by you, why come ye to me? or why come you to me, ye seeing [knowing] that fact which follows, viz. ye hate me. In this case, seeing retains its participial character, although its relation to the pronoun is somewhat obscured. Originally, seeing, in this use, had direct relation to the speaker or to some other person. "Mow I know that thou fearest God, seeing thou hast not witheld thy son." Genesis 22. Here seeing refers to I, or according to the language of syntax, agrees or accords with I. I know thou fearest God, for I see thou hast not withheld thine only son; I know thou fearest God by seeing, in consequence of seeing this fact, thou hast not withheld thine only son. But the use of seeing is extended to cases in which it cannot be referred to a specifec person or persons, in which cases it expresses the notoriety or admission of a fact in general, and is left, like the French on, in the phrases on dit, on voit, without application to any particular person.]

WordNet (r) 3.0 (2005)

adj
1: having vision, not blind n
1: perception by means of the eyes [syn: visual perception, beholding, seeing]
2: normal use of the faculty of vision [syn: eyesight, seeing, sightedness]

Merriam Webster's

I. conjunction Date: 1503 inasmuch as often used with as or that II. noun Date: 1903 the quality of the images of celestial bodies observed telescopically

Oxford Reference Dictionary

conj. & n. --conj. (usu. foll. by that + clause) considering that, inasmuch as, because (seeing that you do not know it yourself). --n. Astron. the quality of observed images as determined by atmospheric conditions.

Webster's 1913 Dictionary

See See, v. t. [imp. Saw; p. p. Seen; p. pr. & vb. n. Seeing.] [OE. seen, sen, seon, As. se['o]n; akin to OFries. s[=i]a, D. zien, OS. & OHG. sehan, G. sehen, Icel. sj[=a], Sw. se, Dan. see, Goth. sa['i]hwan, and probably to L. sequi to follow (and so originally meaning, to follow with the eyes). Gr. ??????, Skr. sac. Cf. Sight, Sun to follow.] 1. To perceive by the eye; to have knowledge of the existence and apparent qualities of by the organs of sight; to behold; to descry; to view. I will new turn aside, and see this great sight. --Ex. iii. 3. 2. To perceive by mental vision; to form an idea or conception of; to note with the mind; to observe; to discern; to distinguish; to understand; to comprehend; to ascertain. Go, I pray thee, see whether it be well with thy brethren. --Gen. xxxvii. 14. Jesus saw that he answered discreetly. --Mark xii. 34. Who 's so gross That seeth not this palpable device? --Shak. 3. To follow with the eyes, or as with the eyes; to watch; to regard attentivelly; to look after. --Shak. I had a mind to see him out, and therefore did not care for centradicting him. --Addison. 4. To have an interview with; especially, to make a call upon; to visit; as, to go to see a friend. And Samuel came no more to see Saul untill the day of his death. --1 Sam. xv. 35. 5. To fall in with; to have intercourse or communication with; hence, to have knowledge or experience of; as, to see military service. Make us glad according to the days wherein thou hast afflicted us, and the years wherein we have seen evil. --Ps. xc. 15. Verily, verily, I say unto you, if a man keep my saying, he shall never see death. --John viii. 51. Improvement in visdom and prudence by seeing men. --Locke. 6. To accompany in person; to escort; to wait upon; as, to see one home; to see one aboard the cars. God you (him, or me, etc.) see, God keep you (him, me, etc.) in his sight; God protect you. [Obs.] --Chaucer. To see (anything) out, to see (it) to the end; to be present at, or attend, to the end. To see stars, to see flashes of light, like stars; -- sometimes the result of concussion of the head. [Colloq.] To see (one) through, to help, watch, or guard (one) to the end of a course or an undertaking.

Webster's 1913 Dictionary

Seeing See"ing, conj. (but originally a present participle). In view of the fact (that); considering; taking into account (that); insmuch as; since; because; -- followed by a dependent clause; as, he did well, seeing that he was so young. Wherefore come ye to me, seeing ye hate me? --Gen. xxvi. 27.

Soule's Dictionary of English Synonyms

I. n. 1. Sight, vision. 2. Perception. II. conj. Considering, since, because, inasmuch as, for the reason that, it being so.



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