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Adjacent Words

Poultry-yard
poultryman
Pounce
Pounce box
Pounce paper
pounce upon
Pounce-box
Pounced
Pouncet box
Pouncet-box
Pouncing
pound away
pound cake
Pound covert
pound mile
pound net
pound of flesh
pound off
Pound overt
pound sign
pound sterling
pound up
Pound-breach

Pound definitions

Webster's 1828 Dictionary

POUND, n. [L. pondo, pondus, weight, a pound; pendo, to weigh, to bend.]
1. A standard weight consisting of twelve ounces troy or sixteen ounces avoirdupois.
2. A money of account consisting of twenty shillings, the value of which is different in different countries. The pound sterling is equivalent to $4.44.44 cts. money of the United States. In New England and Virginia, the pound is equal to $3 1/3; in New York to $2 1/2.
POUND, n. An inclosure erected by authority, in which cattle or other beasts are confined when taken in trespassing, or going at large in violation of law; a pin-fold.
POUND, v.t. To confine in a public pound.
POUND, v.t.
1. To beat; to strike with some heavy instrument, and with repeated blows, so as to make an impression.
With cruel blows she pounds her blubber'd cheeks.
2. To comminute and pulverize by beating; to bruise or break into fine parts by a heavy instrument; as, to pound spice or salt.
Loud strokes with pounding spice the fabric rend.

WordNet (r) 3.0 (2005)

n
1: 16 ounces avoirdupois; "he got a hernia when he tried to lift 100 pounds" [syn: pound, lb]
2: the basic unit of money in Great Britain and Northern Ireland; equal to 100 pence [syn: British pound, pound, British pound sterling, pound sterling, quid]
3: a unit of apothecary weight equal to 12 ounces troy
4: the basic unit of money in Syria; equal to 100 piasters [syn: Syrian pound, pound]
5: the basic unit of money in the Sudan; equal to 100 piasters [syn: Sudanese pound, pound]
6: the basic unit of money in Lebanon; equal to 100 piasters [syn: Lebanese pound, pound]
7: formerly the basic unit of money in Ireland; equal to 100 pence [syn: Irish pound, Irish punt, punt, pound]
8: the basic unit of money in Egypt; equal to 100 piasters [syn: Egyptian pound, pound]
9: the basic unit of money in Cyprus; equal to 100 cents [syn: Cypriot pound, pound]
10: a nontechnical unit of force equal to the mass of 1 pound with an acceleration of free fall equal to 32 feet/sec/sec [syn: pound, lbf.]
11: United States writer who lived in Europe; strongly influenced the development of modern literature (1885-1972) [syn: Pound, Ezra Pound, Ezra Loomis Pound]
12: a symbol for a unit of currency (especially for the pound sterling in Great Britain) [syn: pound, pound sign]
13: a public enclosure for stray or unlicensed dogs; "unlicensed dogs will be taken to the pound" [syn: pound, dog pound]
14: the act of pounding (delivering repeated heavy blows); "the sudden hammer of fists caught him off guard"; "the pounding of feet on the hallway" [syn: hammer, pound, hammering, pounding] v
1: hit hard with the hand, fist, or some heavy instrument; "the salesman pounded the door knocker"; "a bible-thumping Southern Baptist" [syn: thump, pound, poke]
2: strike or drive against with a heavy impact; "ram the gate with a sledgehammer"; "pound on the door" [syn: ram, ram down, pound]
3: move heavily or clumsily; "The heavy man lumbered across the room" [syn: lumber, pound]
4: move rhythmically; "Her heart was beating fast" [syn: beat, pound, thump]
5: partition off into compartments; "The locks pound the water of the canal" [syn: pound, pound off]
6: shut up or confine in any enclosure or within any bounds or limits; "The prisoners are safely pounded" [syn: pound, pound up]
7: place or shut up in a pound; "pound the cows so they don't stray" [syn: impound, pound]
8: break down and crush by beating, as with a pestle; "pound the roots with a heavy flat stone"

Merriam Webster's

I. biographical name Ezra Loomis 1885-1972 American poet Poundian adjective II. biographical name Roscoe 1870-1964 American jurist

Merriam Webster's

I. noun (plural pounds; also pound) Etymology: Middle English, from Old English pund, from Latin pondo pound, from ablative of pondus weight more at pendant Date: before 12th century 1. any of various units of mass and weight; specifically a unit now in general use among English-speaking peoples equal to 16 avoirdupois ounces or 7000 grains or 0.4536 kilogram see weight table 2. a. the basic monetary unit of the United Kingdom called also pound sterling b. any of numerous basic monetary units of other countries see money table c. the basic monetary unit of Ireland from 1921 to 2001 d. lira II II. noun Etymology: Middle English, enclosure, from Old English pund- Date: 14th century 1. a. an enclosure for animals; especially a public enclosure for stray or unlicensed animals <a dog pound> b. a depot for holding impounded personal property until redeemed by the owner <a car pound> 2. a place or condition of confinement 3. an enclosure within which fish are kept or caught; especially the inner compartment of a fish trap or pound net III. verb Etymology: alteration of Middle English pounen, from Old English p?nian Date: 1594 transitive verb 1. to reduce to powder or pulp by beating 2. a. to strike heavily or repeatedly b. to produce with or as if with repeated vigorous strokes usually used with out <pound out a story on the typewriter> c. to inculcate by insistent repetition ; drive <day after day the facts were pounded home to them Ivy B. Priest> d. to move, throw, or carry forcefully and aggressively <pound the ball down the field> 3. to move along heavily or persistently <pounded the pavement looking for work> 4. to drink or consume rapidly ; slug <pound down some beers> intransitive verb 1. to strike heavy repeated blows 2. pulsate, throb <my heart was pounding> 3. a. to move with or make a heavy repetitive sound b. to work hard and continuously usually used with away IV. noun Date: 1876 an act or sound of pounding

Oxford Reference Dictionary

1. n. 1 a unit of weight equal to 16 oz. avoirdupois (0.4536 kg), or 12 oz. troy (0.3732 kg). 2 (in full pound sterling) (pl. same or pounds) the chief monetary unit of the UK and several other countries. Phrases and idioms: pound cake a rich cake containing a pound (or equal weights) of each chief ingredient. pound coin (or note) a coin or note worth one pound sterling. pound of flesh any legitimate but crippling demand. pound Scots hist. 1s. 8d. pound sign the sign £, representing a pound. Etymology: OE pund ult. f. L pondo Roman pound weight of 12 ounces 2. v. 1 tr. a crush or beat with repeated heavy blows. b thump or pummel, esp. with the fists. c grind to a powder or pulp. 2 intr. (foll. by at, on) deliver heavy blows or gunfire. 3 intr. (foll. by along etc.) make one's way heavily or clumsily. 4 intr. (of the heart) beat heavily. Phrases and idioms: pound out produce with or as if with heavy blows. Derivatives: pounder n. Etymology: OE punian, rel. to Du. puin, LG pün rubbish 3. n. & v. --n. 1 an enclosure where stray animals or officially removed vehicles are kept until redeemed. 2 a place of confinement. --v.tr. enclose (cattle etc.) in a pound. Phrases and idioms: pound lock a lock with two gates to confine water and often a side reservoir to maintain the water level. Etymology: ME f. OE pund- in pundfald: see PINFOLD

Webster's 1913 Dictionary

Pound Pound, v. i. 1. To strike heavy blows; to beat. 2. (Mach.) To make a jarring noise, as in running; as, the engine pounds.

Webster's 1913 Dictionary

Pound Pound, n. [AS. pund an inclosure: cf. forpyndan to turn away, or to repress, also Icel. pynda to extort, torment, Ir. pont, pond, pound. Cf. Pinder, Pinfold, Pin to inclose, Pond.] 1. An inclosure, maintained by public authority, in which cattle or other animals are confined when taken in trespassing, or when going at large in violation of law; a pinfold. --Shak. 2. A level stretch in a canal between locks. 3. (Fishing) A kind of net, having a large inclosure with a narrow entrance into which fish are directed by wings spreading outward. Pound covert, a pound that is close or covered over, as a shed. Pound overt, a pound that is open overhead.

Webster's 1913 Dictionary

Pound Pound, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Pounded; p. pr. & vb. n. Pounding.] [OE. pounen, AS. punian to bruise. Cf. Pun a play on words.] 1. To strike repeatedly with some heavy instrument; to beat. With cruel blows she pounds her blubbered cheeks. --Dryden. 2. To comminute and pulverize by beating; to bruise or break into fine particles with a pestle or other heavy instrument; as, to pound spice or salt.

Webster's 1913 Dictionary

Pound Pound, v. t. To confine in, or as in, a pound; to impound. --Milton.

Webster's 1913 Dictionary

Pound Pound, n.; pl. Pounds, collectively Pound or Pounds. [AS. pund, fr. L. pondo, akin to pondus a weight, pendere to weigh. See Pendant.] 1. A certain specified weight; especially, a legal standard consisting of an established number of ounces. Note: The pound in general use in the United States and in England is the pound avoirdupois, which is divided into sixteen ounces, and contains 7,000 grains. The pound troy is divided into twelve ounces, and contains 5,760 grains. 144 pounds avoirdupois are equal to 175 pounds troy weight. See Avoirdupois, and Troy. 2. A British denomination of money of account, equivalent to twenty shillings sterling, and equal in value to about $4.86. There is no coin known by this name, but the gold sovereign is of the same value. Note: The pound sterling was in Saxon times, about a. d. 671, a pound troy of silver, and a shilling was its twentieth part; consequently the latter was three times as large as it is at present. --Peacham.

Webster's 1913 Dictionary

Pound Pound, n.; pl. Pounds, collectively Pound or Pounds. [AS. pund, fr. L. pondo, akin to pondus a weight, pendere to weigh. See Pendant.] 1. A certain specified weight; especially, a legal standard consisting of an established number of ounces. Note: The pound in general use in the United States and in England is the pound avoirdupois, which is divided into sixteen ounces, and contains 7,000 grains. The pound troy is divided into twelve ounces, and contains 5,760 grains. 144 pounds avoirdupois are equal to 175 pounds troy weight. See Avoirdupois, and Troy. 2. A British denomination of money of account, equivalent to twenty shillings sterling, and equal in value to about $4.86. There is no coin known by this name, but the gold sovereign is of the same value. Note: The pound sterling was in Saxon times, about a. d. 671, a pound troy of silver, and a shilling was its twentieth part; consequently the latter was three times as large as it is at present. --Peacham.

Collin's Cobuild Dictionary

(pounds, pounding, pounded) Frequency: The word is one of the 700 most common words in English. 1. The pound is the unit of money which is used in Britain. It is represented by the symbol . One British pound is divided into a hundred pence. Some other countries, for example Egypt, also have a unit of money called a pound. Beer cost three pounds a bottle... A thousand pounds worth of jewellery and silver has been stolen. ...multi-million pound profits. ...a pound coin. N-COUNT: num N 2. The pound is used to refer to the British currency system, and sometimes to the currency systems of other countries which use pounds. The pound is expected to continue to increase against most other currencies. N-SING: the N 3. A pound is a unit of weight used mainly in Britain, America, and other countries where English is spoken. One pound is equal to 0.454 kilograms. A pound of something is a quantity of it that weighs one pound. Her weight was under ninety pounds. ...a pound of cheese. N-COUNT: num N, N of n 4. A pound is a place where dogs and cats found wandering in the street are taken and kept until they are claimed by their owners. N-COUNT 5. A pound is a place where cars that have been parked illegally are taken by the police and kept until they have been claimed by their owners. N-COUNT 6. If you pound something or pound on it, you hit it with great force, usually loudly and repeatedly. He pounded the table with his fist... Somebody began pounding on the front door... She came at him, pounding her fists against his chest. ...the pounding waves. VERB: V n, V prep/adv, V n prep, V-ing 7. If you pound something, you crush it into a paste or a powder or into very small pieces. She paused as she pounded the maize grains. VERB: V n 8. If your heart is pounding, it is beating with an unusually strong and fast rhythm, usually because you are afraid. I'm sweating, my heart is pounding. I can't breathe. VERB: V pounding ...the fast pounding of her heart. N-UNCOUNT: usu N of n 9. see also pounding

Easton's Bible Dictionary

(1.) A weight. Heb. maneh, equal to 100 shekels (1 Kings 10:17; Ezra 2:69; Neh. 7:71, 72). Gr. litra, equal to about 12 oz. avoirdupois (John 12:3; 19:39).

(2.) A sum of money; the Gr. mna or mina (Luke 19:13, 16, 18, 20, 24, 25). It was equal to 100 drachmas, and was of the value of about $3, 6s. 8d. of our money. (See MONEY.)

International Standard Bible Encyclopedia

pound (maneh; mna, litra; Latin, libra): Pound does not correctly represent the Hebrew maneh, which was more than a pound (see MANEH). The litra of Joh 12:3 and 19:39 is the Roman pound (libra) of 4,950 grains, which is less than a pound troy, being about 10 1/3 oz. In a monetary sense (its use in Lu 19:13-25) it is the mna, or maneh, which was either of silver or gold, the former, which is probably the one referred to by Luke, being equal to 6,17 British pounds, or about $33 (in 1915); the latter 102,10 British pounds or $510 (in 1915).

See WEIGHTS AND MEASURES.

Figurative: "Pound," like "talent," is used in the New Testament for intellectual gifts and spiritual endowments, as in the passage given above.

H. Porter

Soule's Dictionary of English Synonyms

v. a. 1. Beat, strike. 2. Bray, bruise, crush, pulverize, triturate, comminute, levigate. 3. Impound, confine in a pound, coop, enclose, shut up.

1811 Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue

To beat. How the milling cove pounded the cull for being nuts on his blowen; how the boxer beat the fellow for taking liberties with his mistress.

1811 Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue

A prison. See LOB'S POUND. Pounded; imprisoned. Shut up in the parson's pound; married. POWDER

Moby Thesaurus

Deutschmark, Mark, Reichsmark, abrade, ache, afghani, agonize, ail, ambush, anguish, anna, assail, assault, atomize, attack, baht, bang, barrage, bash, baste, bat, batter, bawbee, beat, beat a ruffle, beat a tattoo, beat into, beat the drum, beat time, beating, belabor, belt, biff, blanch, blench, blitz, blow, bludgeon, bonk, bottle up, box up, bray, brecciate, bruise, buffet, bung, bung up, bushwhack, cage, carat, cattery, cent, centavo, centigram, centime, check, chop, cleanse, clear, clip, clobber, cloister, clout, clump, come at, come down on, comminute, compound, confine, constrain, conto, contriturate, contuse, coop, coop in, coop up, cork up, count, count the beats, crack, crack down on, cram in, crib, crowd in, crown, crumb, crumble, crush, cudgel, cut, dash, decagram, decigram, descend on, descend upon, detain, dig, din, ding, dint, disintegrate, dog pound, doghouse, dollar, dong, dram, dram avoirdupois, drive, drive in, drub, drubbing, drum, drum music, drumbeat, drumfire, drumming, dyne, empty, encage, enclose, enclosure, expel, fall on, fall upon, farthing, feel pain, feel the pangs, fence in, fiver, flail, flap, florin, flounder, flour, flutter, force, force in, fourpence, fourpenny, fragment, franc, fusillade, gang up on, go at, go for, go pitapat, grain, gram, granulate, granulize, grate, grave, grimace, grind, grind to powder, groat, guilder, guinea, gulden, half crown, half dollar, halfpenny, hammer, harry, have a misery, have at, heave, hell, hem in, hit, hit like lightning, hobbyhorse, hold, hold in custody, hold in restraint, hundredweight, hurt, immure, impact, impound, inhibit, jab, jam in, jump, keep in, keep in custody, keep in detention, keep time, kennel, kilo, kilogram, kip, knock, knock in, kopeck, krona, krone, lambaste, land on, larrup, lay at, lay hands on, lay into, levigate, lick, light into, limbo, lira, lurch, mag, make heavy weather, mash, mass, maul, meg, megaton, mew, mew up, mill, milligram, milreis, mite, mole, monkey, mug, new pence, np, ounce, ounce avoirdupois, ounce troy, p, palpitate, palpitation, paradiddle, paste, patter, pelt, pen, pen up, pence, penfold, penny, pennyweight, peseta, pestle, pie, piece of eight, pinfold, pistareen, pitapat, pitch, pitch and toss, pitch into, pitter-patter, place of confinement, play drum, plunge, plunge in, plunk, poke, poke in, pommel, pony, pounce upon, pound avoirdupois, pound in, pound out, pound troy, poundal, pounding, powder, press in, produce, pulp, pulsate, pulsation, pulse, pulverize, pummel, punch, purgatory, purge, push in, quid, rail in, ram in, rand, rap, rat-a-tat, rat-tat, rat-tat-tat, rataplan, rattattoo, rear, reduce to powder, reel, restrain, restrict, rial, rid, rock, roll, rub-a-dub, ruble, ruff, ruffle, run in, rupee, sail into, scend, scrunch, scruple, seal up, set on, set upon, shackle, shard, shekel, shilling, shoot, shred, shrink, shut in, shut up, sixpence, slam, sledgehammer, slog, slug, smack, smart, smash, sock, sol, sou, sound a tattoo, spank, spatter, splatter, splutter, sputter, squash, squeeze in, staccato, stamp, stiver, stone, strike, stroke, stuff in, suffer, surprise, swat, sway, swing, swipe, swoop down on, take the offensive, tamp in, tap, tat-tat, tattoo, tenner, thrash, threepence, threepenny bit, thresh, thrill, thrippence, throb, throbbing, thrum, thrust in, thump, thumping, thwack, tingle, tom-tom, ton, toss, toss and tumble, triturate, tumble, tuppence, twinge, twitch, twopence, units of weight, wade into, wall in, wallop, wallow, wedge in, weight, welter, whack, whip, whop, wince, won, work over, writhe, yard, yaw, yen, yerk



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