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Poem definitions

Webster's 1828 Dictionary

PO'EM, n. [L. poema; Gr. to make, to compose songs.]
1. A metrical composition; a composition in which the verses consist of certain measures, whether in blank verse or in rhyme; as the poems of Homer or of Milton; opposed to prose.
2. This term is also applied to some compositions in which the language is that of excited imagination; as the poems of Ossian.

WordNet (r) 3.0 (2005)

n
1: a composition written in metrical feet forming rhythmical lines [syn: poem, verse form]

Merriam Webster's

noun Etymology: Middle French poeme, from Latin poema, from Greek poi?ma, from poiein Date: 15th century 1. a composition in verse 2. something suggesting a poem (as in expressiveness, lyricism, or formal grace) <the house we stayed in…was itself a poem — H. J. Laski>

Oxford Reference Dictionary

n. 1 a metrical composition, usu. concerned with feeling or imaginative description. 2 an elevated composition in verse or prose. 3 something with poetic qualities (a poem in stone). Etymology: F poème or L poema f. Gk poema = poiema f. poieo make

Webster's 1913 Dictionary

Secular Sec"u*lar, a. [OE. secular, seculer. L. saecularis, fr. saeculum a race, generation, age, the times, the world; perhaps akin to E. soul: cf. F. s['e]culier.] 1. Coming or observed once in an age or a century. The secular year was kept but once a century. --Addison. 2. Pertaining to an age, or the progress of ages, or to a long period of time; accomplished in a long progress of time; as, secular inequality; the secular refrigeration of the globe. 3. Of or pertaining to this present world, or to things not spiritual or holy; relating to temporal as distinguished from eternal interests; not immediately or primarily respecting the soul, but the body; worldly. New foes arise, Threatening to bind our souls with secular chains. --Milton. 4. (Eccl.) Not regular; not bound by monastic vows or rules; not confined to a monastery, or subject to the rules of a religious community; as, a secular priest. He tried to enforce a stricter discipline and greater regard for morals, both in the religious orders and the secular clergy. --Prescett. 5. Belonging to the laity; lay; not clerical. I speak of folk in secular estate. --Chaucer. Secular equation (Astron.), the algebraic or numerical expression of the magnitude of the inequalities in a planet's motion that remain after the inequalities of a short period have been allowed for. Secular games (Rom. Antiq.), games celebrated, at long but irregular intervals, for three days and nights, with sacrifices, theatrical shows, combats, sports, and the like. Secular music, any music or songs not adapted to sacred uses. Secular hymn or poem, a hymn or poem composed for the secular games, or sung or rehearsed at those games.

Webster's 1913 Dictionary

Poem Po"em, n. [L. po["e]ma, Gr. ?, fr. ? to make, to compose, to write, especially in verse: cf. F. po["e]me.] 1. A metrical composition; a composition in verse written in certain measures, whether in blank verse or in rhyme, and characterized by imagination and poetic diction; -- contradistinguished from prose; as, the poems of Homer or of Milton. 2. A composition, not in verse, of which the language is highly imaginative or impassioned; as, a prose poem; the poems of Ossian.

Collin's Cobuild Dictionary

(poems) Frequency: The word is one of the 3000 most common words in English. A poem is a piece of writing in which the words are chosen for their beauty and sound and are carefully arranged, often in short lines which rhyme. N-COUNT

Soule's Dictionary of English Synonyms

n. Metrical composition, piece of poetry.

Moby Thesaurus

English sonnet, Horatian ode, Italian sonnet, Petrarchan sonnet, Pindaric ode, Sapphic ode, Shakespearean sonnet, alba, anacreontic, article, autograph, balada, ballad, ballade, brainchild, bucolic, canso, chanson, clerihew, composition, computer printout, copy, dirge, dithyramb, ditty, document, draft, eclogue, edited version, elegy, engrossment, epic, epigram, epithalamium, epode, epopee, epopoeia, epos, essay, eyeful, fair copy, fiction, final draft, finished version, first draft, flimsy, georgic, ghazel, haiku, holograph, idyll, jingle, letter, limerick, literae scriptae, literary artefact, literary production, literature, lucubration, lyric, madrigal, manuscript, matter, monody, narrative poem, nonfiction, nursery rhyme, ode, opus, original, palinode, paper, parchment, pastoral, pastoral elegy, pastorela, pastourelle, penscript, picture, piece, piece of writing, play, poesy, poetry, printed matter, printout, production, prothalamium, reading matter, recension, rhapsody, rhyme, rondeau, rondel, roundel, roundelay, rune, satire, screed, scrip, script, scrive, scroll, second draft, sestina, sloka, song, sonnet, sonnet sequence, tanka, tenso, tenzone, the written word, thing of beauty, threnody, transcript, transcription, triolet, troubadour poem, typescript, verse, verselet, versicle, version, villanelle, virelay, vision, work, writing



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