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Wordswarms From Years Past


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on one's haunches
On one's honor
on one's last legs
On one's legs
on one's mettle
on one's own
on one's own account
on one's own hook
on one's own initiative
on one's own terms
on one's part
on one's sleeve
on one's toes
on one's uppers
on one's way
on order
on pain of
on paper
on pins and needles
on purpose
on record
on report
on request
on sale
On shore
on sight
on speaking terms
on standby
on stilts
On sufferance

on or upon definitions

Webster's 1913 Dictionary

(a) To put in order in a particular manner; to prepare; as, to set (that is, to hone) a razor; to set a saw. Tables for to sette, and beddes make. --Chaucer. (b) To extend and bring into position; to spread; as, to set the sails of a ship. (c) To give a pitch to, as a tune; to start by fixing the keynote; as, to set a psalm. --Fielding. (d) To reduce from a dislocated or fractured state; to replace; as, to set a broken bone. (e) To make to agree with some standard; as, to set a watch or a clock. (f) (Masonry) To lower into place and fix solidly, as the blocks of cut stone in a structure. 6. To stake at play; to wager; to risk. I have set my life upon a cast, And I will stand the hazard of the die. --Shak. 7. To fit with music; to adapt, as words to notes; to prepare for singing. Set thy own songs, and sing them to thy lute. --Dryden. 8. To determine; to appoint; to assign; to fix; as, to set a time for a meeting; to set a price on a horse. 9. To adorn with something infixed or affixed; to stud; to variegate with objects placed here and there. High on their heads, with jewels richly set, Each lady wore a radiant coronet. --Dryden. Pastoral dales thin set with modern farms. --Wordsworth. 10. To value; to rate; -- with at. Be you contented, wearing now the garland, To have a son set your decrees at naught. --Shak. I do not set my life at a pin's fee. --Shak. 11. To point out the seat or position of, as birds, or other game; -- said of hunting dogs. 12. To establish as a rule; to furnish; to prescribe; to assign; as, to set an example; to set lessons to be learned. 13. To suit; to become; as, it sets him ill. [Scot.] 14. (Print.) To compose; to arrange in words, lines, etc.; as, to set type; to set a page. To set abroach. See Abroach. [Obs.] --Shak. To set against, to oppose; to set in comparison with, or to oppose to, as an equivalent in exchange; as, to set one thing against another. To set agoing, to cause to move. To set apart, to separate to a particular use; to separate from the rest; to reserve. To set a saw, to bend each tooth a little, every alternate one being bent to one side, and the intermediate ones to the other side, so that the opening made by the saw may be a little wider than the thickness of the back, to prevent the saw from sticking. To set aside. (a) To leave out of account; to pass by; to omit; to neglect; to reject; to annul. Setting aside all other considerations, I will endeavor to know the truth, and yield to that. --Tillotson. (b) To set apart; to reserve; as, to set aside part of one's income. (c) (Law) See under Aside. To set at defiance, to defy. To set at ease, to quiet; to tranquilize; as, to set the heart at ease. To set at naught, to undervalue; to contemn; to despise. ``Ye have set at naught all my counsel.'' --Prov. i. 25. To set a trap, snare, or gin, to put it in a proper condition or position to catch prey; hence, to lay a plan to deceive and draw another into one's power. To set at work, or To set to work. (a) To cause to enter on work or action, or to direct how tu enter on work. (b) To apply one's self; -- used reflexively. To set before. (a) To bring out to view before; to exhibit. (b) To propose for choice to; to offer to. To set by. (a) To set apart or on one side; to reject. (b) To attach the value of (anything) to. ``I set not a straw by thy dreamings.'' --Chaucer. To set by the compass, to observe and note the bearing or situation of by the compass. To set case, to suppose; to assume. Cf. Put case, under Put, v. t. [Obs.] --Chaucer. To set down. (a) To enter in writing; to register. Some rules were to be set down for the government of the army. --Clarendon. (b) To fix; to establish; to ordain. This law we may name eternal, being that order which God . . . hath set down with himself, for himself to do all things by. --Hooker. (c) To humiliate. To set eyes on, to see; to behold; to fasten the eyes on. To set fire to, or To set on fire, to communicate fire to; fig., to inflame; to enkindle the passions of; to irritate. To set flying (Naut.), to hook to halyards, sheets, etc., instead of extending with rings or the like on a stay; -- said of a sail. To set forth. (a) To manifest; to offer or present to view; to exhibt; to display. (b) To publish; to promulgate; to make appear. --Waller. (c) To send out; to prepare and send. [Obs.] The Venetian admiral had a fleet of sixty galleys, set forth by the Venetians. --Knolles. To set forward. (a) To cause to advance. (b) To promote. To set free, to release from confinement, imprisonment, or bondage; to liberate; to emancipate. To set in, to put in the way; to begin; to give a start to. [Obs.] If you please to assist and set me in, I will recollect myself. --Collier. To set in order, to adjust or arrange; to reduce to method. ``The rest will I set in order when I come.'' --1 Cor. xi. 34. To set milk. (a) To expose it in open dishes in order that the cream may rise to the surface. (b) To cause it to become curdled as by the action of rennet. See 4 (e) . To set much, or little, by, to care much, or little, for. To set of, to value; to set by. [Obs.] ``I set not an haw of his proverbs.'' --Chaucer. To set off. (a) To separate from a whole; to assign to a particular purpose; to portion off; as, to set off a portion of an estate. (b) To adorn; to decorate; to embellish. They . . . set off the worst faces with the best airs. --Addison. (c) To give a flattering description of. To set off against, to place against as an equivalent; as, to set off one man's services against another's. To set on or upon. (a) To incite; to instigate. ``Thou, traitor, hast set on thy wife to this.'' --Shak. (b) To employ, as in a task. `` Set on thy wife to observe.'' --Shak. (c) To fix upon; to attach strongly to; as, to set one's heart or affections on some object. See definition 2, above. To set one's cap for. See under Cap, n. To set one's self against, to place one's self in a state of enmity or opposition to. To set one's teeth, to press them together tightly. To set on foot, to set going; to put in motion; to start. To set out. (a) To assign; to allot; to mark off; to limit; as, to set out the share of each proprietor or heir of an estate; to set out the widow's thirds. (b) To publish, as a proclamation. [Obs.] (c) To adorn; to embellish. An ugly woman, in rich habit set out with jewels, nothing can become. --Dryden. (d) To raise, equip, and send forth; to furnish. [R.] The Venetians pretend they could set out, in case of great necessity, thirty men-of-war. --Addison. (e) To show; to display; to recommend; to set off. I could set out that best side of Luther. --Atterbury. (f) To show; to prove. [R.] ``Those very reasons set out how heinous his sin was.'' --Atterbury. (g) (Law) To recite; to state at large.

Webster's 1913 Dictionary

Cast Cast (k[.a]st), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Cast; p. pr. & vb. n. Casting.] [Cf. Dan. kaste, Icel. & Sw. kasta; perh. akin to L. gerere to bear, carry. E. jest.] 1. To send or drive by force; to throw; to fling; to hurl; to impel. Uzziah prepared . . . slings to cast stones. --2 Chron. xxvi. 14. Cast thy garment about thee, and follow me. --Acts. xii. 8. We must be cast upon a certain island. --Acts. xxvii. 26. 2. To direct or turn, as the eyes. How earnestly he cast his eyes upon me! --Shak. 3. To drop; to deposit; as, to cast a ballot. 4. To throw down, as in wrestling. --Shak. 5. To throw up, as a mound, or rampart. Thine enemies shall cast a trench [bank] about thee. --Luke xix. 48. 6. To throw off; to eject; to shed; to lose. His filth within being cast. --Shak. Neither shall your vine cast her fruit. --Mal. iii. 11 The creatures that cast the skin are the snake, the viper, etc. --Bacon. 7. To bring forth prematurely; to slink. Thy she-goats have not cast their young. --Gen. xxi. 38. 8. To throw out or emit; to exhale. [Obs.] This . . . casts a sulphureous smell. --Woodward. 9. To cause to fall; to shed; to reflect; to throw; as, to cast a ray upon a screen; to cast light upon a subject. 10. To impose; to bestow; to rest. The government I cast upon my brother. --Shak. Cast thy burden upon the Lord. --Ps. iv. 22. 11. To dismiss; to discard; to cashier. [Obs.] The state can not with safety cast him. 12. To compute; to reckon; to calculate; as, to cast a horoscope. ``Let it be cast and paid.'' --Shak. You cast the event of war, my noble lord. --Shak. 13. To contrive; to plan. [Archaic] The cloister . . . had, I doubt not, been cast for [an orange-house]. --Sir W. Temple. 14. To defeat in a lawsuit; to decide against; to convict; as, to be cast in damages. She was cast to be hanged. --Jeffrey. Were the case referred to any competent judge, they would inevitably be cast. --Dr. H. More. 15. To turn (the balance or scale); to overbalance; hence, to make preponderate; to decide; as, a casting voice. How much interest casts the balance in cases dubious! --South. 16. To form into a particular shape, by pouring liquid metal or other material into a mold; to fashion; to found; as, to cast bells, stoves, bullets. 17. (Print.) To stereotype or electrotype. 18. To fix, distribute, or allot, as the parts of a play among actors; also to assign (an actor) for a part. Our parts in the other world will be new cast. --Addison. To cast anchor (Naut.) See under Anchor. To cast a horoscope, to calculate it. To cast a horse, sheep, or other animal, to throw with the feet upwards, in such a manner as to prevent its rising again. To cast a shoe, to throw off or lose a shoe, said of a horse or ox. To cast aside, to throw or push aside; to neglect; to reject as useless or inconvenient. To cast away. (a) To throw away; to lavish; to waste. ``Cast away a life'' --Addison. (b) To reject; to let perish. ``Cast away his people.'' --Rom. xi. 1. ``Cast one away.'' --Shak. (c) To wreck. ``Cast away and sunk.'' --Shak. To cast by, to reject; to dismiss or discard; to throw away. To cast down, to throw down; to destroy; to deject or depress, as the mind. ``Why art thou cast down. O my soul?'' --Ps. xiii. 5. To cast forth, to throw out, or eject, as from an inclosed place; to emit; to send out. To cast in one's lot with, to share the fortunes of. To cast in one's teeth, to upbraid or abuse one for; to twin. To cast lots. See under Lot. To cast off. (a) To discard or reject; to drive away; to put off; to free one's self from. (b) (Hunting) To leave behind, as dogs; also, to set loose, or free, as dogs. --Crabb. (c) (Naut.) To untie, throw off, or let go, as a rope. To cast off copy, (Print.), to estimate how much printed matter a given amount of copy will make, or how large the page must be in order that the copy may make a given number of pages. To cast one's self on or upon to yield or submit one's self unreservedly to, as to the mercy of another. To cast out, to throw out; to eject, as from a house; to cast forth; to expel; to utter. To cast the lead (Naut.), to sound by dropping the lead to the bottom. To cast the water (Med.), to examine the urine for signs of disease. [Obs.]. To cast up. (a) To throw up; to raise. (b) To compute; to reckon, as the cost. (c) To vomit. (d) To twit with; to throw in one's teeth.

Webster's 1913 Dictionary

Give Give, v. i. 1. To give a gift or gifts. 2. To yield to force or pressure; to relax; to become less rigid; as, the earth gives under the feet. 3. To become soft or moist. [Obs.] --Bacon . 4. To move; to recede. Now back he gives, then rushes on amain. --Daniel. 5. To shed tears; to weep. [Obs.] Whose eyes do never give But through lust and laughter. --Shak. 6. To have a misgiving. [Obs.] My mind gives ye're reserved To rob poor market women. --J. Webster. 7. To open; to lead. [A Gallicism] This, yielding, gave into a grassy walk. --Tennyson. To give back, to recede; to retire; to retreat. They gave back and came no farther. --Bunyan. To give in, to yield; to succumb; to acknowledge one's self beaten; to cease opposition. The Scots battalion was enforced to give in. --Hayward. This consideration may induce a translator to give in to those general phrases. --Pope. To give off, to cease; to forbear. [Obs.] --Locke. To give on or upon. (a) To rush; to fall upon. [Obs.] (b) To have a view of; to be in sight of; to overlook; to look toward; to open upon; to front; to face. [A Gallicism: cf. Fr. donner sur.] Rooms which gave upon a pillared porch. --Tennyson. The gloomy staircase on which the grating gave. --Dickens. To give out. (a) To expend all one's strength. Hence: (b) To cease from exertion; to fail; to be exhausted; as, my feet being to give out; the flour has given out. To give over, to cease; to discontinue; to desist. It would be well for all authors, if they knew when to give over, and to desist from any further pursuits after fame. --Addison. To give up, to cease from effort; to yield; to despair; as, he would never give up.

Webster's 1913 Dictionary

Close Close, v. i. 1. To come together; to unite or coalesce, as the parts of a wound, or parts separated. What deep wounds ever closed without a scar? --Byron. 2. To end, terminate, or come to a period; as, the debate closed at six o'clock. 3. To grapple; to engage in hand-to-hand fight. They boldly closed in a hand-to-hand contest. --Prescott. To close on or upon, to come to a mutual agreement; to agree on or join in. ``Would induce France and Holland to close upon some measures between them to our disadvantage.'' --Sir W. Temple. To close with. (a) To accede to; to consent or agree to; as, to close with the terms proposed. (b) To make an agreement with. To close with the land (Naut.), to approach the land.

Webster's 1913 Dictionary

Condition Con*di"tion, n. [F., fr. L. conditio (better condicio) agreement, compact, condition; con- + a root signifying to show, point out, akin to dicere to say, dicare to proclaim, dedicate. See Teach, Token.] 1. Mode or state of being; state or situation with regard to external circumstances or influences, or to physical or mental integrity, health, strength, etc.; predicament; rank; position, estate. I am in my condition A prince, Miranda; I do think, a king. --Shak. And O, what man's condition can be worse Than his whom plenty starves and blessings curse? --Cowley. The new conditions of life. --Darwin. 2. Essential quality; property; attribute. It seemed to us a condition and property of divine powers and beings to be hidden and unseen to others. --Bacon. 3. Temperament; disposition; character. [Obs.] The condition of a saint and the complexion of a devil. --Shak. 4. That which must exist as the occasion or concomitant of something else; that which is requisite in order that something else should take effect; an essential qualification; stipulation; terms specified. I had as lief take her dowry with this condition, to be whipped at the high cross every morning. --Shak. Many are apt to believe remission of sins, but they believe it without the condition of repentance. --Jer. Taylor. 5. (Law) A clause in a contract, or agreement, which has for its object to suspend, to defeat, or in some way to modify, the principal obligation; or, in case of a will, to suspend, revoke, or modify a devise or bequest. It is also the case of a future uncertain event, which may or may not happen, and on the occurrence or non-occurrence of which, the accomplishment, recission, or modification of an obligation or testamentary disposition is made to depend. --Blount. Tomlins. Bouvier. Wharton. Equation of condition. (Math.) See under Equation. On or Upon condition (that), used for if in introducing conditional sentences. ``Upon condition thou wilt swear to pay him tribute . . . thou shalt be placed as viceroy under him.'' --Shak. Conditions of sale, the terms on which it is proposed to sell property by auction; also, the instrument containing or expressing these terms. Syn: State; situation; circumstances; station; case; mode; plight; predicament; stipulation; qualification; requisite; article; provision; arrangement. See State.




 


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