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Adjacent Words

money belt
Money bill
money box
Money broker
money changer
money cowrie
money dealer
money for old rope
money handler
money hungry
money laundering
money mad
money market
money of account
money or silver
money plant
money saving
Money scrivener
Money spider
Money spinner
money supply
Money's worth
MONEY, CURRENT
MONEY, LOVE OF
money, quantity theory of
MONEY, SIN
money-back
Money-bag
Money-box
Money-broker

money order definitions

WordNet (r) 3.0 (2005)

n
1: a written order for the payment of a sum to a named individual; obtainable and payable at a post office [syn: money order, postal order]

Merriam Webster's

noun Date: 1802 an order issued by a post office, bank, or telegraph office for payment of a specified sum of money usually at any branch of the organization

Britannica Concise

Certificate requiring the issuer to pay a certain sum of money on demand to a specific person or organization. Money orders provide a fast, safe, and convenient means of transferring small sums of money. They are issued by governments (usually through postal authorities), banks, and other qualified institutions to buyers who pay the issuer the face amount of the money order plus a service charge. Because they are exchangeable for cash on demand, they are a generally accepted means of payment. The Amer. Express Co., which began issuing money orders in 1882, is the largest nonbank issuer; its money orders are used throughout the world. See also currency.

Webster's 1913 Dictionary

Money bill (Legislation), a bill for raising revenue. Money broker, a broker who deals in different kinds of money; one who buys and sells bills of exchange; -- called also money changer. Money cowrie (Zo["o]l.), any one of several species of Cypr[ae]a (esp. C. moneta) formerly much used as money by savage tribes. See Cowrie. Money of account, a denomination of value used in keeping accounts, for which there may, or may not, be an equivalent coin; e. g., the mill is a money of account in the United States, but not a coin. Money order, an order for the payment of money; specifically, a government order for the payment of money, issued at one post office as payable at another; -- called also postal money order.

Webster's 1913 Dictionary

9. A body of persons having some common honorary distinction or rule of obligation; esp., a body of religious persons or aggregate of convents living under a common rule; as, the Order of the Bath; the Franciscan order. Find a barefoot brother out, One of our order, to associate me. --Shak. The venerable order of the Knights Templars. --Sir W. Scott. 10. An ecclesiastical grade or rank, as of deacon, priest, or bishop; the office of the Christian ministry; -- often used in the plural; as, to take orders, or to take holy orders, that is, to enter some grade of the ministry. 11. (Arch.) The disposition of a column and its component parts, and of the entablature resting upon it, in classical architecture; hence (as the column and entablature are the characteristic features of classical architecture) a style or manner of architectural designing. Note: The Greeks used three different orders, easy to distinguish, Doric, Ionic, and Corinthian. The Romans added the Tuscan, and changed the Doric so that it is hardly recognizable, and also used a modified Corinthian called Composite. The Renaissance writers on architecture recognized five orders as orthodox or classical, -- Doric (the Roman sort), Ionic, Tuscan, Corinthian, and Composite. See Illust. of Capital. 12. (Nat. Hist.) An assemblage of genera having certain important characters in common; as, the Carnivora and Insectivora are orders of Mammalia. Note: The Linn[ae]an artificial orders of plants rested mainly on identity in the numer of pistils, or agreement in some one character. Natural orders are groups of genera agreeing in the fundamental plan of their flowers and fruit. A natural order is usually (in botany) equivalent to a family, and may include several tribes. 13. (Rhet.) The placing of words and members in a sentence in such a manner as to contribute to force and beauty or clearness of expression. 14. (Math.) Rank; degree; thus, the order of a curve or surface is the same as the degree of its equation. Artificial order or system. See Artificial classification, under Artificial, and Note to def. 12 above. Close order (Mil.), the arrangement of the ranks with a distance of about half a pace between them; with a distance of about three yards the ranks are in open order. The four Orders, The Orders four, the four orders of mendicant friars. See Friar. --Chaucer. General orders (Mil.), orders issued which concern the whole command, or the troops generally, in distinction from special orders. Holy orders. (a) (Eccl.) The different grades of the Christian ministry; ordination to the ministry. See def. 10 above. (b) (R. C. Ch.) A sacrament for the purpose of conferring a special grace on those ordained. In order to, for the purpose of; to the end; as means to. The best knowledge is that which is of greatest use in order to our eternal happiness. --Tillotson. Minor orders (R. C. Ch.), orders beneath the diaconate in sacramental dignity, as acolyte, exorcist, reader, doorkeeper. Money order. See under Money. Natural order. (Bot.) See def. 12, Note. Order book. (a) A merchant's book in which orders are entered. (b) (Mil.) A book kept at headquarters, in which all orders are recorded for the information of officers and men. (c) A book in the House of Commons in which proposed orders must be entered. [Eng.] Order in Council, a royal order issued with and by the advice of the Privy Council. [Great Britain] Order of battle (Mil.), the particular disposition given to the troops of an army on the field of battle. Order of the day, in legislative bodies, the special business appointed for a specified day. Order of a differential equation (Math.), the greatest index of differentiation in the equation. Sailing orders (Naut.), the final instructions given to the commander of a ship of war before a cruise. Sealed orders, orders sealed, and not to be opened until a certain time, or arrival at a certain place, as after a ship is at sea. Standing order. (a) A continuing regulation for the conduct of parliamentary business. (b) (Mil.) An order not subject to change by an officer temporarily in command. To give order, to give command or directions. --Shak. To take order for, to take charge of; to make arrangements concerning. Whiles I take order for mine own affairs. --Shak. Syn: Arrangement; management. See Direction.

Collin's Cobuild Dictionary

(money orders) A money order is a piece of paper representing a sum of money which you can buy at a post office and send to someone as a way of sending them money by post. (AM; in BRIT, use postal order) N-COUNT

Moby Thesaurus

CD, IOU, MO, acceptance, acceptance bill, bank acceptance, bank check, bill, bill of draft, bill of exchange, blank check, certificate, certificate of deposit, certified check, check, checkbook, cheque, commercial paper, debenture, demand bill, demand draft, draft, due bill, exchequer bill, letter of credit, negotiable instrument, note, note of hand, paper, postal order, promissory note, sight bill, sight draft, time bill, time draft, trade acceptance, treasury bill, voucher, warrant




 


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