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invite out
Invited
invitee
Invitement
Inviter
Invitiate
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Invitingly
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Invitrifiable
Invocate
Invocated
Invocating
invocational
invocatory
Invoice
Invoiced
Invoicing
Invoke
Invoked
invoker
Invoking
Involucel
Involucella
Involucellate

Invocation definitions

Webster's 1828 Dictionary

INVOCA'TION, n. [L. invocatio.]
1. The act of addressing in prayer.
2. The form or act of calling for the assistance or presence of any being, particularly of some divinity; as the invocation of the muses.
The whole poem is a prayer to Fortune, and the invocation is divided between the two deities.
3. A judicial call, demand or order; as the invocation of papers or evidence into a court.

WordNet (r) 3.0 (2005)

n
1: a prayer asking God's help as part of a religious service [syn: invocation, supplication]
2: an incantation used in conjuring or summoning a devil
3: calling up a spirit or devil [syn: conjuring, conjuration, conjury, invocation]
4: the act of appealing for help

Merriam Webster's

noun Etymology: Middle English invocacioun, from Middle French & Latin; Middle French invocation, from Latin invocation-, invocatio, from invocare Date: 14th century 1. a. the act or process of petitioning for help or support; specifically often capitalized a prayer of entreaty (as at the beginning of a service of worship) b. a calling upon for authority or justification 2. a formula for conjuring ; incantation 3. an act of legal or moral implementation ; enforcement invocational adjective invocatory adjective

Oxford Reference Dictionary

n. 1 the act or an instance of invoking, esp. in prayer. 2 an appeal to a supernatural being or beings, e.g. the Muses, for psychological or spiritual inspiration. 3 Eccl. the words 'In the name of the Father' etc. used as the preface to a sermon etc. Derivatives: invocatory adj. Etymology: ME f. OF f. L invocatio -onis (as INVOKE)

Webster's 1913 Dictionary

Invocation In`vo*ca"tion, n. [F. invocation, L. invocatio.] 1. The act or form of calling for the assistance or presence of some superior being; earnest and solemn entreaty; esp., prayer offered to a divine being. Sweet invocation of a child; most pretty and pathetical! --Shak. The whole poem is a prayer to Fortune, and the invocation is divided between the two deities. --Addison. 2. (Law) A call or summons; especially, a judicial call, demand, or order; as, the invocation of papers or evidence into court.

Collin's Cobuild Dictionary

(invocations) 1. An invocation is a request for help or forgiveness made to a god. (FORMAL) ...an invocation for divine guidance. N-VAR: oft N prep 2. An invocation is a prayer at a public meeting, usually at the beginning. (AM) N-COUNT

Soule's Dictionary of English Synonyms

n. 1. Supplication, prayer, petition, orison. 2. Invoking. See invoke.

Moby Thesaurus

Angelus, Ave, Ave Maria, Hail Mary, Kyrie Eleison, Paternoster, adjuration, agape, aid prayer, appeal, asperges, aspersion, auricular confession, bar mitzvah, bas mitzvah, beadroll, beads, beck, beck and call, benedicite, benediction, benison, beseechment, bid, bidding, bidding prayer, blessing, breviary, call, calling, calling forth, celebration, chaplet, circumcision, clamor, collect, communion, confession, confirmation, conjuration, conjurement, contemplation, convocation, cry, devotions, entreaty, evocation, exorcisation, exorcism, exsufflation, grace, high celebration, impetration, imploration, imploring, imprecation, incantation, incense, indent, intercession, invocation of saints, invocatory plea, kiss of peace, lesser litany, litany, love feast, lustration, meditation, nod, obsecration, obtestation, orison, pax, petition, plea, prayer, prayer wheel, preconization, processional, reciting the rosary, requisition, rogation, rosary, silent prayer, suit, summons, supplication, telling of beads, thanks, thanksgiving, the confessional, the confessionary



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