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Full-text Search for "Gregorian calendar"
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Gregorian calendar definitions

WordNet (r) 3.0 (2005)

n
1: the solar calendar now in general use, introduced by Gregory XIII in 1582 to correct an error in the Julian calendar by suppressing 10 days, making Oct 5 be called Oct 15, and providing that only centenary years divisible by 400 should be leap years; it was adopted by Great Britain and the American colonies in 1752 [syn: Gregorian calendar, New Style calendar]

Merriam Webster's

noun Date: circa 1771 a calendar in general use introduced in 1582 by Pope Gregory XIII as a revision of the Julian calendar, adopted in Great Britain and the American colonies in 1752, marked by the suppression of 10 days or after 1700 11 days, and having leap years in every year divisible by four with the restriction that centesimal years are leap years only when divisible by 400 see month table

Oxford Reference Dictionary

n. the calendar introduced in 1582 by Pope Gregory XIII, as a correction of the Julian calendar. Etymology: med.L Gregorianus f. LL Gregorius f. Gk Gregorios Gregory

Webster's 1913 Dictionary

Calendar Cal"en*dar, n. [OE. kalender, calender, fr. L. kalendarium an interest or account book (cf. F. calendrier, OF. calendier) fr. L. calendue, kalendae, calends. See Calends.] 1. An orderly arrangement of the division of time, adapted to the purposes of civil life, as years, months, weeks, and days; also, a register of the year with its divisions; an almanac. 2. (Eccl.) A tabular statement of the dates of feasts, offices, saints' days, etc., esp. of those which are liable to change yearly according to the varying date of Easter. 3. An orderly list or enumeration of persons, things, or events; a schedule; as, a calendar of state papers; a calendar of bills presented in a legislative assembly; a calendar of causes arranged for trial in court; a calendar of a college or an academy. Note: Shepherds of people had need know the calendars of tempests of state. --Bacon. Calendar clock, one that shows the days of the week and month. Calendar month. See under Month. French Republican calendar. See under Vend['e]miaire. Gregorian calendar, Julian calendar, Perpetual calendar. See under Gregorian, Julian, and Perpetual.

Webster's 1913 Dictionary

Gregorian Gre*go"ri*an, a. [NL. Gregorianus, fr. Gregorius Gregory, Gr. ?: cf. F. gr['e]gorien.] Pertaining to, or originated by, some person named Gregory, especially one of the popes of that name. Gregorian calendar, the calendar as reformed by Pope Gregory XIII. in 1582, including the method of adjusting the leap years so as to harmonize the civil year with the solar, and also the regulation of the time of Easter and the movable feasts by means of epochs. See Gregorian year (below). Gregorian chant (Mus.), plain song, or canto fermo, a kind of unisonous music, according to the eight celebrated church modes, as arranged and prescribed by Pope Gregory I. (called ``the Great'') in the 6th century. Gregorian modes, the musical scales ordained by Pope Gregory the Great, and named after the ancient Greek scales, as Dorian, Lydian, etc. Gregorian telescope (Opt.), a form of reflecting telescope, named from Prof. James Gregory, of Edinburgh, who perfected it in 1663. A small concave mirror in the axis of this telescope, having its focus coincident with that of the large reflector, transmits the light received from the latter back through a hole in its center to the eyepiece placed behind it. Gregorian year, the year as now reckoned according to the Gregorian calendar. Thus, every year, of the current reckoning, which is divisible by 4, except those divisible by 100 and not by 400, has 366 days; all other years have 365 days. See Bissextile, and Note under Style, n., 7.



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