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Garcinia cambogia
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Garcon
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garda
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garden current
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Garden engine

Garden definitions

Webster's 1828 Dictionary

G`ARDEN, n. [Eng. yard, an inclosed place; L. hortus.]
1. A piece of ground appropriated to the cultivation of herbs, or plants, fruits and flowers; usually near a mansion-house. Land appropriated to the raising of culinary herbs and roots for domestic use, is called a kitchen-garden; that appropriated to flowers and shrubs is called a flower garden; and that to fruits, is called a fruit garden. But these uses are sometimes blended.
2. A rich, well cultivated spot or tract of country; a delightful spot. The intervals on the river Connecticut are all a garden. Lombardy is the garden of Italy.
Garden, in composition, is used adjectively, as garden-mold, a rich fine mold or soil; garden-tillage,the tillage used in cultivating gardens.
G`ARDEN, v.i. To layout and to cultivate a garden; to prepare ground to plant and till it, for the purpose of producing plants, shrubs, flowers and fruits.

WordNet (r) 3.0 (2005)

n
1: a plot of ground where plants are cultivated
2: the flowers or vegetables or fruits or herbs that are cultivated in a garden
3: a yard or lawn adjoining a house v
1: work in the garden; "My hobby is gardening"

Merriam Webster's

biographical name Mary 1874-1967 American (Scottish-born) soprano

Merriam Webster's

I. noun Etymology: Middle English gardin, from Anglo-French gardin, jardin, of Germanic origin; akin to Old High German gart enclosure more at yard Date: 13th century 1. a. a plot of ground where herbs, fruits, flowers, or vegetables are cultivated b. a rich well-cultivated region c. a container (as a window box) planted with usually a variety of small plants 2. a. a public recreation area or park usually ornamented with plants and trees <a botanical garden> b. an open-air eating or drinking place c. a large hall for public entertainment gardenful noun II. verb (gardened; gardening) Date: 1577 intransitive verb to lay out or work in a garden transitive verb 1. to make into a garden 2. to ornament with gardens gardener noun III. adjective Date: 15th century 1. of, relating to, used in, or frequenting a garden 2. a. of a kind grown in the open as distinguished from one more delicate <garden plant> b. commonly found ; garden-variety

Britannica Concise

Plot of ground where herbs, fruits, flowers, vegetables, or trees are cultivated. The earliest surviving detailed garden plan is Egyptian and dates from about 1400 BC; it shows tree-lined avenues and rectangular ponds. Mesopotamian gardens were places where shade and cool water could be enjoyed; Hellenistic gardens were conspicuously luxurious in their display of precious materials, a tradition carried over by Byzantine gardens. Islamic gardens made use of water, often in pools and fed by narrow canals resembling irrigation channels. In Renaissance Europe, gardens reflected confidence in human ability to impose order on the external world; Italian gardens emphasized the unity of house and garden. French 17th-cent. gardens were rigidly symmetrical, and French cultural dominance in Europe popularized this style into the next century. In 18th-cent. England, increasing awareness of the natural world led to the development of "natural" gardens that made use of irregular, nonsymmetrical layouts. Chinese gardens have generally harmonized with the natural landscape, and have employed rocks gathered from great distances as a universal decorative feature. Early Japanese gardens imitated Chinese principles; later developments were the abstract garden, which might feature only sand and rocks, and miniature gardens made in trays (see bonsai).

Oxford Reference Dictionary

n. & v. --n. 1 esp. Brit. a piece of ground, usu. partly grassed and adjoining a private house, used for growing flowers, fruit, or vegetables, and as a place of recreation. 2 (esp. in pl.) ornamental grounds laid out for public enjoyment (botanical gardens). 3 a similar place with the service of refreshments (tea garden). 4 (attrib.) a (of plants) cultivated, not wild. b for use in a garden (garden seat). 5 (usu. in pl. prec. by a name) Brit. a street, square, etc. (Onslow Gardens). 6 an especially fertile region. 7 US a large public hall. 8 (the Garden) the philosophy or school of Epicurus. --v.intr. cultivate or work in a garden. Phrases and idioms: garden centre an establishment where plants and garden equipment etc. are sold. garden city an industrial or other town laid out systematically with spacious surroundings, parks, etc. garden cress a cruciferous plant, Lepidium sativum, used in salads. garden party a social event held on a lawn or in a garden. garden suburb Brit. a suburb laid out spaciously with open spaces, parks, etc. garden warbler a European woodland songbird, Sylvia borin. Derivatives: gardenesque adj. gardening n. Etymology: ME f. ONF gardin (OF jardin) ult. f. Gmc: cf. YARD(2)

Webster's 1913 Dictionary

Garden Gar"den (g[aum]r"d'n; 277), n. [OE. gardin, OF. gardin, jardin, F. jardin, of German origin; cf. OHG. garto, G. garten; akin to AS. geard. See Yard an inclosure.] 1. A piece of ground appropriated to the cultivation of herbs, fruits, flowers, or vegetables. 2. A rich, well-cultivated spot or tract of country. I am arrived from fruitful Lombardy, The pleasant garden of great Italy. --Shak. Note: Garden is often used adjectively or in self-explaining compounds; as, garden flowers, garden tools, garden walk, garden wall, garden house or gardenhouse. Garden balsam, an ornamental plant (Impatiens Balsamina). Garden engine, a wheelbarrow tank and pump for watering gardens. Garden glass. (a) A bell glass for covering plants. (b) A globe of dark-colored glass, mounted on a pedestal, to reflect surrounding objects; -- much used as an ornament in gardens in Germany. Garden house (a) A summer house. --Beau. & Fl. (b) A privy. [Southern U.S.] Garden husbandry, the raising on a small scale of seeds, fruits, vegetables, etc., for sale. Garden mold or mould, rich, mellow earth which is fit for a garden. --Mortimer. Garden nail, a cast nail used, for fastening vines to brick walls. --Knight. Garden net, a net for covering fruits trees, vines, etc., to protect them from birds. Garden party, a social party held out of doors, within the grounds or garden attached to a private residence. Garden plot, a plot appropriated to a garden. Garden pot, a watering pot. Garden pump, a garden engine; a barrow pump. Garden shears, large shears, for clipping trees and hedges, pruning, etc. Garden spider, (Zo["o]l.), the diadem spider (Epeira diadema), common in gardens, both in Europe and America. It spins a geometrical web. See Geometric spider, and Spider web. Garden stand, a stand for flower pots. Garden stuff, vegetables raised in a garden. [Colloq.] Garden syringe, a syringe for watering plants, sprinkling them with solutions for destroying insects, etc. Garden truck, vegetables raised for the market. [Colloq.] Garden ware, garden truck. [Obs.] --Mortimer. Bear garden, Botanic garden, etc. See under Bear, etc. Hanging garden. See under Hanging. Kitchen garden, a garden where vegetables are cultivated for household use. Market garden, a piece of ground where vegetable are cultivated to be sold in the markets for table use.

Webster's 1913 Dictionary

Garden Gar"den (g[aum]r"d'n; 277), n. [OE. gardin, OF. gardin, jardin, F. jardin, of German origin; cf. OHG. garto, G. garten; akin to AS. geard. See Yard an inclosure.] 1. A piece of ground appropriated to the cultivation of herbs, fruits, flowers, or vegetables. 2. A rich, well-cultivated spot or tract of country. I am arrived from fruitful Lombardy, The pleasant garden of great Italy. --Shak. Note: Garden is often used adjectively or in self-explaining compounds; as, garden flowers, garden tools, garden walk, garden wall, garden house or gardenhouse. Garden balsam, an ornamental plant (Impatiens Balsamina). Garden engine, a wheelbarrow tank and pump for watering gardens. Garden glass. (a) A bell glass for covering plants. (b) A globe of dark-colored glass, mounted on a pedestal, to reflect surrounding objects; -- much used as an ornament in gardens in Germany. Garden house (a) A summer house. --Beau. & Fl. (b) A privy. [Southern U.S.] Garden husbandry, the raising on a small scale of seeds, fruits, vegetables, etc., for sale. Garden mold or mould, rich, mellow earth which is fit for a garden. --Mortimer. Garden nail, a cast nail used, for fastening vines to brick walls. --Knight. Garden net, a net for covering fruits trees, vines, etc., to protect them from birds. Garden party, a social party held out of doors, within the grounds or garden attached to a private residence. Garden plot, a plot appropriated to a garden. Garden pot, a watering pot. Garden pump, a garden engine; a barrow pump. Garden shears, large shears, for clipping trees and hedges, pruning, etc. Garden spider, (Zo["o]l.), the diadem spider (Epeira diadema), common in gardens, both in Europe and America. It spins a geometrical web. See Geometric spider, and Spider web. Garden stand, a stand for flower pots. Garden stuff, vegetables raised in a garden. [Colloq.] Garden syringe, a syringe for watering plants, sprinkling them with solutions for destroying insects, etc. Garden truck, vegetables raised for the market. [Colloq.] Garden ware, garden truck. [Obs.] --Mortimer. Bear garden, Botanic garden, etc. See under Bear, etc. Hanging garden. See under Hanging. Kitchen garden, a garden where vegetables are cultivated for household use. Market garden, a piece of ground where vegetable are cultivated to be sold in the markets for table use.

Webster's 1913 Dictionary

Garden Gar"den, v. i. [imp. & p. p. Gardened; p. pr. & vb. n. Gardening.] To lay out or cultivate a garden; to labor in a garden; to practice horticulture.

Webster's 1913 Dictionary

Garden Gar"den, v. t. To cultivate as a garden.

Collin's Cobuild Dictionary

(gardens, gardening, gardened) Frequency: The word is one of the 1500 most common words in English. 1. In British English, a garden is a piece of land next to a house, with flowers, vegetables, other plants, and often grass. In American English, the usual word is yard, and a garden refers only to land which is used for growing flowers and vegetables. ...the most beautiful garden on Earth. N-COUNT 2. If you garden, you do work in your garden such as weeding or planting. Jim gardened at the homes of friends on weekends. VERB: V gardening I have taken up gardening again. 3. Gardens are places like a park that have areas of plants, trees, and grass, and that people can visit and walk around. The Gardens are open from 10.30am until 5pm. ...Kensington Gardens. N-PLURAL 4. Gardens is sometimes used as part of the name of a street. He lives at 9, Acacia Gardens. N-IN-NAMES

International Standard Bible Encyclopedia

gar'-d'-n (gan, gannah, ginnah; kepos): The Arabic jannah (diminutive, jannainah), like the Hebrew gannah, literally, "a covered or hidden place," denotes in the mind of the dweller in the East something more than the ordinary garden. Gardens in Biblical times, such as are frequently referred to in Semitic literature, were usually walled enclosures, as the name indicates (La 2:6 the American Revised Version, margin), in which there were paths winding in and out among shade and fruit trees, canals of running water, fountains, sweet-smelling herbs, aromatic blossoms and convenient arbors in which to sit and enjoy the effect. These gardens are mentioned in Ge 2 and Ge 3; 13:10; So 4:12-16; Ec 2:5,6; Eze 28:13; 31:8,9; 36:35; Joe 2:3. Ancient Babylonian, Assyrian and Egyptian records show the fondness of the rulers of these countries for gardens laid out on a grand scale and planted with the rarest trees and plants. The drawings made by the ancients of their gardens leave no doubt about their general features and their correspondence with Biblical gardens. The Persian word pardec (paradeisos) appears in the later Hebrew writings to denote more extensive gardens or parks. It is translated "orchards" in Ec 2:5 the King James Version; So 4:13.

See PARADISE.

Such gardens are still common throughout the Levant. They are usually situated on the outskirts of a city (compare Joh 18:1,26; 19:41), except in the case of the more pretentious estates of rich pashas or of the government seats (compare 2Ki 21:18; Es 1:5; 7:7,8; Ne 3:15; 2Ki 25:4; Jer 39:4; 52:7). They are enclosed with walls of mud blocks, as in Damascus, or stone walls capped with thorns, or with hedges of thorny bushes (compare La 2:6 the American Revised Version, margin), or prickly pear. In nearly treeless countries, where there is no rain during 4 or 5 months, at least, of the year, the gardens are often the only spots where trees and other vegetation can flourish, and here the existence of vegetation depends upon the water supply, brought in canals from streams, or raised from wells by more or less crude lifting machines (compare Nu 24:7). Such references as Ge 2:10; Nu 24:6; De 11:10; Isa 1:30; 58:11; So 4:15 indicate that in ancient times they were as dependent upon irrigation in Biblical lands as at present. The planning of their gardens so as to utilize the water supplies has become instinctive with the inhabitants of Palestine and Syria. The writer has seen a group of young Arab boys modeling a garden out of mud and conducting water to irrigate it by channels from a nearby canal, in a manner that a modern engineer would admire. Gardens are cultivated, not only for their fruits and herbs (compare So 6:11; Isa 1:8; 1Ki 21:2) and shade (compare So 6:11; Lu 13:19), but they are planned to serve as dwelling-places during the summer time when the houses are hot and stuffy. That this was an ancient practice is indicated by So 5:2; 6:2; 8:13. A shaded garden, the air laden with the ethereal perfumes of fruits and flowers, accompanied by the music of running water, a couch on which to sit or recline, suggest a condition of bliss dear to the Oriental. Only one who has traveled for days in a dry, glaring desert country and has come upon a spot like the gardens of such a city as Damascus, can realize how near like paradise these gardens can appear. Mohammed pictured such a place as the future abode of his followers

No doubt the remembrances of his visit to Damascus were fresh in his mind when he wrote. El-Jannah is used by the Moslems to signify the "paradise of the faithful."

Gardens were used as places of sacrifice, especially in heathen worship (Isa 1:29; 65:3; 66:17). They sometimes contained burial places (2Ki 21:18,26; Joh 19:41).

Figurative: The destruction of gardens typified desolation (Am 4:9); on the other hand, fruitful gardens figured prosperity (Nu 24:6; Job 8:16; Isa 51:3; 58:11; 61:11; Jer 29:5,28; 31:12; Am 9:14).

James A. Patch

Foolish Dictionary

From the Fr. garantir, to make good. Hence, a place where lovers make good.

Moby Thesaurus

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