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Full-text Search for "Fault"
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Fault definitions

Webster's 1828 Dictionary

FAULT, n. [See Fail.]
1. Properly, an erring or missing; a failing; hence, an error or mistake; a blunder; a defect; a blemish; whatever impairs excellence; applied to things.
2. In morals or deportment, any error or defect; an imperfection; any deviation from propriety; a slight offense; a neglect of duty or propriety, resulting from inattention or want of prudence, rather than from design to injure or offend, but liable to censure or objection.
I do remember my faults this day. Genesis 41.
If a man be overtaken in a fault, ye who are spiritual, restore such as one in the spirit of meekness. Galatians 6.
Fault implies wrong, and often some degree of criminality.
3. Defect; want; absence. [Not now used. See Default.]
I could tell to thee, as to one if pleases me, for fault of a better to call my friend.
4. Puzzle; difficulty.
Among sportsmen, when dogs lose the scent, they are said to be at fault. Hence the phrase, the inquirer is at fault.
5. In mining, a fissure in strata, causing a dislocation of the same, and thus interrupting the course of veins.
To find fault, to express blame; to complain.
Thou wilt say then, why doth he yet find fault? Romans 9.
To find fault with, to blame; to censure; as, to find fault with the times, or with a neighbor's conduct.
FAULT, v.i. To fail; to be wrong. [Not used.]
FAULT, v.t. To charge with a fault; to accuse.
For that I will not fault thee.

WordNet (r) 3.0 (2005)

n
1: a wrong action attributable to bad judgment or ignorance or inattention; "he made a bad mistake"; "she was quick to point out my errors"; "I could understand his English in spite of his grammatical faults" [syn: mistake, error, fault]
2: an imperfection in an object or machine; "a flaw caused the crystal to shatter"; "if there are any defects you should send it back to the manufacturer" [syn: defect, fault, flaw]
3: the quality of being inadequate or falling short of perfection; "they discussed the merits and demerits of her novel"; "he knew his own faults much better than she did" [syn: demerit, fault] [ant: merit, virtue]
4: (geology) a crack in the earth's crust resulting from the displacement of one side with respect to the other; "they built it right over a geological fault"; "he studied the faulting of the earth's crust" [syn: fault, faulting, geological fault, shift, fracture, break]
5: (electronics) equipment failure attributable to some defect in a circuit (loose connection or insulation failure or short circuit etc.); "it took much longer to find the fault than to fix it"
6: responsibility for a bad situation or event; "it was John's fault"
7: (sports) a serve that is illegal (e.g., that lands outside the prescribed area); "he served too many double faults" v
1: put or pin the blame on [syn: blame, fault] [ant: absolve, free, justify]

Merriam Webster's

I. noun Etymology: Middle English faute, falte, from Anglo-French, from Vulgar Latin *fallita, from feminine of fallitus, past participle of Latin fallere to deceive, disappoint Date: 13th century 1. obsolete lack 2. a. weakness, failing; especially a moral weakness less serious than a vice b. a physical or intellectual imperfection or impairment ; defect c. an error especially in service in a net or racket game 3. a. misdemeanor b. mistake 4. responsibility for wrongdoing or failure <the accident was the driver's fault> 5. a fracture in the crust of a planet (as the earth) or moon accompanied by a displacement of one side of the fracture with respect to the other usually in a direction parallel to the fracture Synonyms: fault, failing, frailty, foible, vice mean an imperfection or weakness of character. fault implies a failure, not necessarily culpable, to reach some standard of perfection in disposition, action, or habit <a writer of many virtues and few faults>. failing suggests a minor shortcoming in character <being late is a failing of mine>. frailty implies a general or chronic proneness to yield to temptation <human frailties>. foible applies to a harmless or endearing weakness or idiosyncrasy <an eccentric's charming foibles>. vice can be a general term for any imperfection or weakness, but it often suggests violation of a moral code or the giving of offense to the moral sensibilities of others <compulsive gambling was his vice>. II. verb Date: 15th century intransitive verb 1. to commit a fault ; err 2. to fracture so as to produce a geologic fault transitive verb 1. to find a fault in <easy to praise this book and to fault it H. G. Roepke> 2. to produce a geologic fault in 3. blame, censure <can't fault them for not coming>

Britannica Concise

In geology, a fracture in the rocks of the earth's crust, where compressional or tensional forces cause the rocks on the opposite sides of the fracture to be displaced relative to each other. Faults range in length from a few inches to hundreds of miles, and displacement may also range from less than an inch to hundreds of miles along the fracture surface (the fault plane). Most, if not all, earthquakes are caused by rapid movement along faults. Faults are common throughout the world. A well-known example is the San Andreas Fault near the W coast of the U.S. The total movement along this fault during the last few million years appears to have been several miles.

Oxford Reference Dictionary

n. & v. --n. 1 a defect or imperfection of character or of structure, appearance, etc. 2 a break or other defect in an electric circuit. 3 a transgression, offence, or thing wrongly done. 4 a Tennis etc. a service of the ball not in accordance with the rules. b (in showjumping) a penalty for an error. 5 responsibility for wrongdoing, error, etc. (it will be your own fault). 6 a defect regarded as the cause of something wrong (the fault lies in the teaching methods). 7 Geol. an extended break in the continuity of strata or a vein. --v. 1 tr. find fault with; blame. 2 tr. declare to be faulty. 3 tr. Geol. break the continuity of (strata or a vein). 4 intr. commit a fault. 5 intr. Geol. show a fault. Phrases and idioms: at fault guilty; to blame. fault-finder a person given to continually finding fault. fault-finding continual criticism. find fault (often foll. by with) make an adverse criticism; complain. to a fault (usu. of a commendable quality etc.) excessively (generous to a fault). Etymology: ME faut(e) f. OF ult. f. L fallere FAIL

Webster's 1913 Dictionary

Fault Fault, n. 1. (Elec.) A defective point in an electric circuit due to a crossing of the parts of the conductor, or to contact with another conductor or the earth, or to a break in the circuit. 2. (Geol. & Mining) A dislocation caused by a slipping of rock masses along a plane of facture; also, the dislocated structure resulting from such slipping. Note: The surface along which the dislocated masses have moved is called the fault plane. When this plane is vertical, the fault is a vertical fault; when its inclination is such that the present relative position of the two masses could have been produced by the sliding down, along the fault plane, of the mass on its upper side, the fault is a normal, or gravity, fault. When the fault plane is so inclined that the mass on its upper side has moved up relatively, the fault is then called a reverse (or reversed), thrust, or overthrust, fault. If no vertical displacement has resulted, the fault is then called a horizontal fault. The linear extent of the dislocation measured on the fault plane and in the direction of movement is the displacement; the vertical displacement is the throw; the horizontal displacement is the heave. The direction of the line of intersection of the fault plane with a horizontal plane is the trend of the fault. A fault is a strike fault when its trend coincides approximately with the strike of associated strata (i.e., the line of intersection of the plane of the strata with a horizontal plane); it is a dip fault when its trend is at right angles to the strike; an oblique fault when its trend is oblique to the strike. Oblique faults and dip faults are sometimes called cross faults. A series of closely associated parallel faults are sometimes called step faults and sometimes distributive faults.

Webster's 1913 Dictionary

Fault Fault, n. 1. (Elec.) A defective point in an electric circuit due to a crossing of the parts of the conductor, or to contact with another conductor or the earth, or to a break in the circuit. 2. (Geol. & Mining) A dislocation caused by a slipping of rock masses along a plane of facture; also, the dislocated structure resulting from such slipping. Note: The surface along which the dislocated masses have moved is called the fault plane. When this plane is vertical, the fault is a vertical fault; when its inclination is such that the present relative position of the two masses could have been produced by the sliding down, along the fault plane, of the mass on its upper side, the fault is a normal, or gravity, fault. When the fault plane is so inclined that the mass on its upper side has moved up relatively, the fault is then called a reverse (or reversed), thrust, or overthrust, fault. If no vertical displacement has resulted, the fault is then called a horizontal fault. The linear extent of the dislocation measured on the fault plane and in the direction of movement is the displacement; the vertical displacement is the throw; the horizontal displacement is the heave. The direction of the line of intersection of the fault plane with a horizontal plane is the trend of the fault. A fault is a strike fault when its trend coincides approximately with the strike of associated strata (i.e., the line of intersection of the plane of the strata with a horizontal plane); it is a dip fault when its trend is at right angles to the strike; an oblique fault when its trend is oblique to the strike. Oblique faults and dip faults are sometimes called cross faults. A series of closely associated parallel faults are sometimes called step faults and sometimes distributive faults.

Webster's 1913 Dictionary

Fault Fault, n. 1. (Elec.) A defective point in an electric circuit due to a crossing of the parts of the conductor, or to contact with another conductor or the earth, or to a break in the circuit. 2. (Geol. & Mining) A dislocation caused by a slipping of rock masses along a plane of facture; also, the dislocated structure resulting from such slipping. Note: The surface along which the dislocated masses have moved is called the fault plane. When this plane is vertical, the fault is a vertical fault; when its inclination is such that the present relative position of the two masses could have been produced by the sliding down, along the fault plane, of the mass on its upper side, the fault is a normal, or gravity, fault. When the fault plane is so inclined that the mass on its upper side has moved up relatively, the fault is then called a reverse (or reversed), thrust, or overthrust, fault. If no vertical displacement has resulted, the fault is then called a horizontal fault. The linear extent of the dislocation measured on the fault plane and in the direction of movement is the displacement; the vertical displacement is the throw; the horizontal displacement is the heave. The direction of the line of intersection of the fault plane with a horizontal plane is the trend of the fault. A fault is a strike fault when its trend coincides approximately with the strike of associated strata (i.e., the line of intersection of the plane of the strata with a horizontal plane); it is a dip fault when its trend is at right angles to the strike; an oblique fault when its trend is oblique to the strike. Oblique faults and dip faults are sometimes called cross faults. A series of closely associated parallel faults are sometimes called step faults and sometimes distributive faults.

Webster's 1913 Dictionary

Fault Fault, n. [OE. faut, faute, F. faute (cf. It., Sp., & Pg. falta), fr. a verb meaning to want, fail, freq., fr. L. fallere to deceive. See Fail, and cf. Default.] 1. Defect; want; lack; default. One, it pleases me, for fault of a better, to call my friend. --Shak. 2. Anything that fails, that is wanting, or that impairs excellence; a failing; a defect; a blemish. As patches set upon a little breach Discredit more in hiding of the fault. --Shak. 3. A moral failing; a defect or dereliction from duty; a deviation from propriety; an offense less serious than a crime. 4. (Geol. & Mining) (a) A dislocation of the strata of the vein. (b) In coal seams, coal rendered worthless by impurities in the seam; as, slate fault, dirt fault, etc. --Raymond. 5. (Hunting) A lost scent; act of losing the scent. Ceasing their clamorous cry till they have singled, With much ado, the cold fault cleary out. --Shak. 6. (Tennis) Failure to serve the ball into the proper court. At fault, unable to find the scent and continue chase; hence, in trouble or embarrassment, and unable to proceed; puzzled; thrown off the track. To find fault, to find reason for blaming or complaining; to express dissatisfaction; to complain; -- followed by with before the thing complained of; but formerly by at. ``Matter to find fault at.'' --Robynson (More's Utopia). Syn: -- Error; blemish; defect; imperfection; weakness; blunder; failing; vice. Usage: Fault, Failing, Defect, Foible. A fault is positive, something morally wrong; a failing is negative, some weakness or falling short in a man's character, disposition, or habits; a defect is also negative, and as applied to character is the absence of anything which is necessary to its completeness or perfection; a foible is a less important weakness, which we overlook or smile at. A man may have many failings, and yet commit but few faults; or his faults and failings may be few, while his foibles are obvious to all. The faults of a friend are often palliated or explained away into mere defects, and the defects or foibles of an enemy exaggerated into faults. ``I have failings in common with every human being, besides my own peculiar faults; but of avarice I have generally held myself guiltless.'' --Fox. ``Presumption and self-applause are the foibles of mankind.'' --Waterland.

Webster's 1913 Dictionary

Fault Fault, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Faulted; p. pr. & vb. n. Faulting.] 1. To charge with a fault; to accuse; to find fault with; to blame. [Obs.] For that I will not fault thee. --Old Song. 2. (Geol.) To interrupt the continuity of (rock strata) by displacement along a plane of fracture; -- chiefly used in the p. p.; as, the coal beds are badly faulted.

Webster's 1913 Dictionary

Fault Fault, v. i. To err; to blunder, to commit a fault; to do wrong. [Obs.] If after Samuel's death the people had asked of God a king, they had not faulted. --Latimer.

Collin's Cobuild Dictionary

(faults, faulting, faulted) Frequency: The word is one of the 3000 most common words in English. 1. If a bad or undesirable situation is your fault, you caused it or are responsible for it. There was no escaping the fact: it was all his fault... A few borrowers will find themselves in trouble with their repayments through no fault of their own. N-SING: with poss 2. A fault is a mistake in what someone is doing or in what they have done. It is a big fault to think that you can learn how to manage people in business school. = error, mistake N-COUNT: usu with supp 3. A fault in someone or something is a weakness in them or something that is not perfect. His manners had always made her blind to his faults. ...a short delay due to a minor technical fault... = failing, flaw N-COUNT: usu with supp, oft poss N 4. If you cannot fault someone, you cannot find any reason for criticizing them or the things that they are doing. You can't fault them for lack of invention... It is hard to fault the way he runs his own operation. VERB: with brd-neg, V n for n/-ing, V n 5. A fault is a large crack in the surface of the earth. ...the San Andreas Fault. N-COUNT 6. A fault in tennis is a service that is wrong according to the rules. N-COUNT 7. If someone or something is at fault, they are to blame or are responsible for a particular situation that has gone wrong. He could never accept that he had been at fault... PHRASE: v-link PHR 8. If you find fault with something or someone, you look for mistakes and complain about them. I was disappointed whenever the cook found fault with my work. PHRASE: V inflects, usu PHR with n 9. If you say that someone has a particular good quality to a fault, you are emphasizing that they have more of this quality than is usual or necessary. Jefferson was generous to a fault... Others will tell you that she is modest to a fault, funny, clever and warm. PHRASE: usu adj PHR [emphasis]

International Standard Bible Encyclopedia

folt (chaTa'; aitia, memphomai): Implies defect, of less moral weight than crime or sin. It is the translation of chaTa', "error," "failure," "sin" (Ex 5:16); of cheT', same meaning (Ge 41:9, "I do remember my faults this day"); of `awon, "perversity," "iniquity" (2Sa 3:8; Ps 59:4); of rish`ah, "wrongness," "wickedness" (De 25:2, the Revised Version (British and American) "wickedness"); of shechath (Aramaic) "corruption" (Da 6:4 twice); me'umah, "anything" (1Sa 29:3, "no fault in him," literally, "not anything"); of aitia, "cause," "case," "guilt," (Joh 18:38; 19:4,6; Pilate of Jesus, "I find no fault in him," the Revised Version (British and American) "no crime"; the same word is rendered "accusation," i.e. `legal cause for prosecution,' Mt 27:37; Mr 15:26; compare Ac 25:18,27); of aition, same meaning (Lu 23:4,14; 23:22, aition thanatou "cause of death"); of hettema, "a worse condition," "defect" (1Co 6:7, the Revised Version (British and American) "a defect," margin "a loss to you"); of paraptoma, "a falling aside" (Ga 6:1, "If a man be overtaken in fault," the Revised Version (British and American) "in any trespass," margin "by"; Jas 5:16, "Confess your faults one to another," the Revised Version (British and American) "Confess therefore your sins one to another"); hamartano, "to miss," "err," "sin," is translated "your faults" (1Pe 2:20 the Revised Version (British and American), "when ye sin"); memphomai, "to blame," is translated "to find fault" (Mr 7:2 omitted the Revised Version (British and American); Ro 9:19; Heb 8:8); elegcho, "to convict," "to tell one's fault" (Mt 18:15, the Revised Version (British and American) "show him his fault"); amomos, "without blemish," "spotless," is translated "without fault" (Re 14:5, the Revised Version (British and American) "without blemish," "faultless"; Jude 1:24, "able to present you faultless," the Revised Version (British and American) "without blemish"); amemptos, "blameless," "without reproach" (Heb 8:7, "for if that first covenant had been faultless"). "Faulty" is the translation of 'ashem, "guilty" (2Sa 14:13, "as one which is faulty," the Revised Version (British and American) "guilty"); of 'asham, "to be or become guilty" (Ho 10:2, Revised Version "guilty").

W. L. Walker

Soule's Dictionary of English Synonyms

n. 1. Defect, blemish, flaw, imperfection, failing, weakness, frailty, moral defect. 2. Misdeed, misdemeanor, offence, trespass, wrong, delinquency, transgression, error, lapse, slip, indiscretion. 3. Mistake (of judgment), error, slip. 4. (Rare.) Default, lack, want. 5. (Geol.) Dislocation, disturbance of strata.

Foolish Dictionary

About the only thing that is often found where it does not exist.

Moby Thesaurus

aberrancy, aberration, abysm, abyss, accountability, accountable, accuse, answerability, answerable, arroyo, at fault, atrocity, bad habit, besetting sin, birthmark, blackhead, blame, blameworthy, bleb, blemish, blister, blunder, boner, boo-boo, boob, box canyon, breach, break, bug, bulla, call into question, call to account, canyon, carp at, catch, cavity, censure, chap, chasm, check, chimney, chink, cicatrix, cleft, clerical error, cleuch, clough, col, comedo, corrigendum, coulee, couloir, crack, cranny, crater, craze, crevasse, crevice, crime, crime against humanity, criticize, culpability, culpable, cut, cwm, deadly sin, defacement, defect, defection, defectiveness, deficiency, defile, deformation, deformity, delinquency, dell, delusion, demerit, dereliction, deviancy, dike, disfiguration, disfigurement, disproportionately, distortion, ditch, donga, draw, drawback, enormity, errancy, erratum, erroneousness, error, evil, excavation, exceedingly, excessively, extremely, failing, failure, fallaciousness, fallacy, falseness, falsity, faultiness, faute, faux pas, felony, find fault, fissure, flaw, flawedness, flume, foible, fracture, frailty, freckle, furrow, fuss, gaffe, gap, gape, gash, gaucherie, genocide, goof, gorge, groove, guilt, guilty, guilty act, gulch, gulf, gully, hamartia, heavy sin, hemangioma, heresy, heterodoxy, hickey, hole, howler, human error, illusion, immoderately, imperfection, impropriety, impugn, in the extreme, inadequacy, incision, indiscretion, inexpiable sin, infirmity, iniquity, injury, injustice, irrationally, joint, keloid, kink, kloof, knock, lapse, leak, lentigo, liability, liable, little problem, malefaction, malfeasance, malum, milium, minor wrong, misapplication, misapprehension, misbehavior, miscalculation, miscarriage, misconception, misconduct, misconstruction, miscount, misdeal, misdeed, misdemeanor, misdoing, misfeasance, misidentification, misinterpretation, misjudgment, misplay, misprint, misquotation, misreport, miss, misstatement, mistake, misunderstanding, misuse, moat, mole, moral flaw, mortal sin, needle scar, nevus, niggle, nonfeasance, notch, nullah, offense, omission, onus, opening, outrage, overly, oversight, pass, passage, peccadillo, peccancy, perversion, pick at, pick on, pimple, pit, pock, pockmark, port-wine mark, port-wine stain, problem, pustule, ravine, rent, responsibility, responsible, rift, rime, rupture, scab, scar, scissure, scratch, seam, sebaceous cyst, self-contradiction, shortcoming, sin, sin of commission, sin of omission, sinful act, sinfulness, slip, slit, slot, snag, something missing, split, strawberry mark, sty, taint, take exception to, to a fault, to blame, tort, track, transgression, trench, trespass, trip, twist, typo, typographical error, unduly, unorthodoxy, unreasonably, untrueness, untruth, untruthfulness, unutterable sin, valley, venial sin, verruca, vesicle, vice, void, vulnerable place, wadi, wale, warp, wart, weak link, weak point, weak side, weakness, weal, welt, wen, whitehead, wrong, wrongness



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