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Explicatory
Explicit
explicit definition
Explicit function
Explicitly
Explicitness
Explode
explode a bombshell
Exploded
Explodent
Exploder
Exploding
exploding cucumber
exploitability
exploitable
exploitation
exploitative
exploitatively
exploitatory
exploited
exploiter
exploitive
Exploiture
Explorable
Explorate
Exploration

Full-text Search for "Exploit"
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Exploit definitions

Webster's 1828 Dictionary

EXPLOIT', n.
1. A deed or act; more especially, a heroic act; a deed of renown; a great or noble achievement; as the exploits of Alexander, of Caesar, of Washington. [Exploiture, in a like sense, is not in use.]
2. In a ludicrous sense, a great act of wickedness.
EXPLOIT', v.t. To achieve. [Not in use.]

WordNet (r) 3.0 (2005)

n
1: a notable achievement; "he performed a great feat"; "the book was her finest effort" [syn: feat, effort, exploit] v
1: use or manipulate to one's advantage; "He exploit the new taxation system"; "She knows how to work the system"; "he works his parents for sympathy" [syn: exploit, work]
2: draw from; make good use of; "we must exploit the resources we are given wisely" [syn: exploit, tap]
3: work excessively hard; "he is exploiting the students" [syn: overwork, exploit]

Merriam Webster's

I. noun Etymology: Middle English espleit, expleit, exploit furtherance, outcome, from Anglo-French, from Latin explicitum, neuter of explicitus, past participle Date: circa 1538 deed, act; especially a notable or heroic act Synonyms: see feat II. transitive verb Date: 1838 1. to make productive use of ; utilize <exploiting your talents> <exploit your opponent's weakness> 2. to make use of meanly or unfairly for one's own advantage <exploiting migrant farm workers> exploitability noun exploitable adjective exploiter noun

Oxford Reference Dictionary

n. & v. --n. a bold or daring feat. --v.tr. 1 make use of (a resource etc.); derive benefit from. 2 usu. derog. utilize or take advantage of (esp. a person) for one's own ends. Derivatives: exploitable adj. exploitation n. exploitative adj. exploiter n. exploitive adj. Etymology: ME f. OF esploit, exploiter ult. f. L explicare: see EXPLICATE

Webster's 1913 Dictionary

Exploit Ex*ploit", n. [OE. esploit success, OF. esploit, espleit,revenue, product, vigor, force, exploit, F. exploit exploit, fr. L. explicitum, prop. p. p. neut. of explicare to unfold, display, exhibit; ex + plicare to fold. See Ply, and cf. Explicit, Explicate.] 1. A deed or act; especially, a heroic act; a deed of renown; an adventurous or noble achievement; as, the exploits of Alexander the Great. Ripe for exploits and mighty enterprises. --Shak. 2. Combat; war. [Obs.] He made haste to exploit some warlike service. --Holland. 2. [F. exploiter.] To utilize; to make available; to get the value or usefulness out of; as, to exploit a mine or agricultural lands; to exploit public opinion. [Recent]

Collin's Cobuild Dictionary

(exploited) Frequency: The word is one of the 3000 most common words in English. 1. If you say that someone is exploiting you, you think that they are treating you unfairly by using your work or ideas and giving you very little in return. Critics claim he exploited black musicians for personal gain. ...the plight of the exploited sugar cane workers. VERB: V n, V-ed exploitation Extra payments should be made to protect the interests of the staff and prevent exploitation. 2. If you say that someone is exploiting a situation, you disapprove of them because they are using it to gain an advantage for themselves, rather than trying to help other people or do what is right. The government and its opponents compete to exploit the troubles to their advantage. VERB: V n [disapproval] exploitation ...the exploitation of the famine by local politicians. N-SING: N of n 3. If you exploit something, you use it well, and achieve something or gain an advantage from it. Cary is hoping to exploit new opportunities in Europe... VERB: V n 4. To exploit resources or raw materials means to develop them and use them for industry or commercial activities. I think we're being very short sighted in not exploiting our own coal. VERB: V n exploitation ...the planned exploitation of its potential oil and natural gas reserves. N-UNCOUNT: usu N of n 5. If you refer to someone's exploits, you mean the brave, interesting, or amusing things that they have done. His wartime exploits were later made into a film. N-COUNT: usu pl, with poss

Soule's Dictionary of English Synonyms

I. n. Act (especially an heroic act), deed, feat, achievement. II. v. a. [Recent.] Utilize, put to use or service, work up.

Moby Thesaurus

abuse, accomplished fact, accomplishment, achievement, act, acta, action, adventure, apply, aristeia, attainment, beguile, benefit from, bestow, bleed, bleed white, blow, bold stroke, capitalize on, cash in on, clip, coup, cultivate, dealings, deed, do, doing, doings, drain, effort, employ, emprise, endeavor, enterprise, exercise, fait accompli, feat, finesse, fleece, gest, go, gouge, hand, handiwork, handle, heroic act, hold up, ill-use, impose, impose upon, improve, improve the occasion, job, jockey, make capital of, make hay, make use of, maneuver, manipulate, measure, milk, misuse, move, operation, overcharge, overprice, overt act, overtax, passage, performance, play, play on, presume upon, proceeding, production, profit by, profiteer, put to advantage, res gestae, screw, skin, soak, step, stick, sting, stroke, stunt, suck dry, surcharge, swindle, take advantage of, thing, thing done, tour de force, trade on, transaction, turn, turn to account, turn to profit, turn to use, undertaking, use, use ill, use to advantage, utilize, venture, victimize, work, work on, work upon, works



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