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diker
Diking
Diklah
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diktat
dil
dilab
Dilacerate
Dilacerated
Dilacerating
Dilaceration
Dilaniate
Dilaniation
Dilantin
Dilapidated
Dilapidating
Dilapidation
Dilapidator
Dilatability
Dilatable
dilatancy
dilatant
Dilatation
dilatation and curettage
dilatational

Dilapidate definitions

Webster's 1828 Dictionary

DILAPIDATE, v.i. [L., to stone; a stone. It seems originally to have signified to pull down stone-work, or to suffer such work to fall to pieces.] To go to ruin; to fall by decay.
DILAPIDATE, v.t.
1. To pull down; to waste or destroy; to suffer to go to ruin.
If the bishop, parson, or vicar, etc., dilapidates the buildings, or cuts down the timber of the patrimony of the church--
2. To waste; to squander.

WordNet (r) 3.0 (2005)

v
1: bring into a condition of decay or partial ruin by neglect or misuse
2: fall into decay or ruin; "The unoccupied house started to decay" [syn: decay, crumble, dilapidate]

Merriam Webster's

verb (-dated; -dating) Etymology: Latin dilapidatus, past participle of dilapidare to squander, destroy, from dis- + lapidare to pelt with stones, from lapid-, lapis stone Date: 1565 transitive verb 1. to bring into a condition of decay or partial ruin <furniture is dilapidated by use Janet Flanner> 2. archaic squander intransitive verb to become dilapidated dilapidation noun

Oxford Reference Dictionary

v.intr. & tr. fall or cause to fall into disrepair or ruin. Etymology: L dilapidare demolish, squander (as DI-(2), lapis lapid- stone)

Webster's 1913 Dictionary

Dilapidate Di*lap"i*date, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Dilapidated; p. pr. & vb. n. Dilapidating.] [L. dilapidare to scatter like stones; di- = dis- + lapidare to throw stones, fr. lapis a stone. See Lapidary.] 1. To bring into a condition of decay or partial ruin, by misuse or through neglect; to destroy the fairness and good condition of; -- said of a building. If the bishop, parson, or vicar, etc., dilapidates the buildings, or cuts down the timber of the patrimony. --Blackstone. 2. To impair by waste and abuse; to squander. The patrimony of the bishopric of Oxon was much dilapidated. --Wood.

Webster's 1913 Dictionary

Dilapidate Di*lap"i*date, v. i. To get out of repair; to fall into partial ruin; to become decayed; as, the church was suffered to dilapidate. --Johnson.

Soule's Dictionary of English Synonyms

v. a. Waste, ruin, destroy, pull down, throw down, suffer to go to ruin.



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