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Danaus plexippus
danazol
Danburite
Danbury
Dance
dance attendance
dance band
dance card
dance floor
dance hall
dance lesson
dance master
dance music
dance notation
dance orchestra
dance palace
dance school
dance step
dance studio
dance to tune
danceable
Danced
dancefloor
dancehall
Dancer
Danceress
danceroom music

dance of death definitions

WordNet (r) 3.0 (2005)

n
1: a medieval dance in which a skeleton representing death leads a procession of others to the grave [syn: danse macabre, dance of death]

Britannica Concise

Medieval allegorical concept of the all-conquering and equalizing power of death, expressed in the drama, poetry, music, and visual arts of Western Europe mainly in the late Middle Ages. It is a literary or pictorial representation of a procession or dance of both living and dead figures, the living arranged in order of their rank, from pope and emperor to child, clerk, and hermit, and the dead leading them to the grave. It was given impetus by the Black Death and the Hundred Years' War. Though depictions declined after the 16th cent., the theme was revived in literature and music of the 19th-20th cent.

Webster's 1913 Dictionary

Dance Dance, n. [F. danse, of German origin. See Dance, v. i.] 1. The leaping, tripping, or measured stepping of one who dances; an amusement, in which the movements of the persons are regulated by art, in figures and in accord with music. 2. (Mus.) A tune by which dancing is regulated, as the minuet, the waltz, the cotillon, etc. Note: The word dance was used ironically, by the older writers, of many proceedings besides dancing. Of remedies of love she knew parchance For of that art she couth the olde dance. --Chaucer. Dance of Death (Art), an allegorical representation of the power of death over all, -- the old, the young, the high, and the low, being led by a dancing skeleton. Morris dance. See Morris. To lead one a dance, to cause one to go through a series of movements or experiences as if guided by a partner in a dance not understood.



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