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contextualism
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contextualize
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Full-text Search for "Context"
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Context definitions

Webster's 1828 Dictionary

CONTEXT, n. [L. Con and texo, to weave.] The general series or composition of a discourse; more particularly, the parts of a discourse which precede or follow the sentence quoted; the passages of scripture which are near the text, either before it or after it. The sense of a passage of scripture is often illustrated by the context.
CONTEXT, a. Knit or woven together; close; firm.
CONTEST, v.t. To knit together. [Not used.]

WordNet (r) 3.0 (2005)

n
1: discourse that surrounds a language unit and helps to determine its interpretation [syn: context, linguistic context, context of use]
2: the set of facts or circumstances that surround a situation or event; "the historical context" [syn: context, circumstance, setting]

Merriam Webster's

noun Etymology: Middle English, weaving together of words, from Latin contextus connection of words, coherence, from contexere to weave together, from com- + texere to weave more at technical Date: circa 1568 1. the parts of a discourse that surround a word or passage and can throw light on its meaning 2. the interrelated conditions in which something exists or occurs ; environment, setting <the historical context of the war> contextless adjective contextual adjective contextually adverb

Oxford Reference Dictionary

n. 1 the parts of something written or spoken that immediately precede and follow a word or passage and clarify its meaning. 2 the circumstances relevant to something under consideration (must be seen in context). Phrases and idioms: out of context without the surrounding words or circumstances and so not fully understandable. Derivatives: contextual adj. contextualize v.tr. (also -ise). contextualization n. contextually adv. Etymology: ME f. L contextus (as COM-, texere text- weave)

Webster's 1913 Dictionary

Context Con"text, n. [L. contextus; cf. F. contexte .] The part or parts of something written or printed, as of Scripture, which precede or follow a text or quoted sentence, or are so intimately associated with it as to throw light upon its meaning. According to all the light that the contexts afford. --Sharp.

Webster's 1913 Dictionary

Context Con*text", v. t. To knit or bind together; to unite closely. [Obs.] --Feltham. The whole world's frame, which is contexted only by commerce and contracts. --R. Junius.

Webster's 1913 Dictionary

Context Con*text", a. [L. contextus, p. p. of contexere to weave, to unite; con- + texere to weave. See Text.] Knit or woven together; close; firm. [Obs.] The coats, without, are context and callous. --Derham.

Collin's Cobuild Dictionary

(contexts) Frequency: The word is one of the 3000 most common words in English. 1. The context of an idea or event is the general situation that relates to it, and which helps it to be understood. We are doing this work in the context of reforms in the economic, social and cultural spheres. ...the historical context in which Chaucer wrote... N-VAR: usu with supp, oft adj N, N of n 2. The context of a word, sentence, or text consists of the words, sentences, or text before and after it which help to make its meaning clear. Without a context, I would have assumed it was written by a man. N-VAR 3. If something is seen in context or if it is put into context, it is considered together with all the factors that relate to it. Taxation is not popular in principle, merely acceptable in context... It is important that we put Jesus into the context of history. PHRASE 4. If a statement or remark is quoted out of context, the circumstances in which it was said are not correctly reported, so that it seems to mean something different from the meaning that was intended. Thomas says that he has been taken out of context on the issue... PHRASE

Soule's Dictionary of English Synonyms

n. Words immediately preceding or following, adjoining matter, connection, connected thought or thoughts.

Moby Thesaurus

alentours, ambiance, ambience, ambit, background, borderlands, circle, circuit, circumambiencies, circumjacencies, circumstances, compass, entourage, environing circumstances, environment, environs, existing conditions, frame of reference, framework, full particulars, gestalt, habitat, ins and outs, milieu, neighborhood, outposts, outskirts, perimeter, periphery, precincts, purlieus, set of conditions, setting, situation, status quo, structure, suburbs, surround, surroundings, total environment, total situation, vicinage, vicinity, whole picture



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